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What are workers compensation class codes? | Class Codes
 
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What are workers compensation class codes? This video explains the following: 1.)What are workers compensation class codes? Workers’ compensation class codes are codes that the insurance companies use to identify specific categories of work. For instance, you may know the job duties of a contractor by their job title. However, the insurance company knows them as “5606”. 2.) What is workers’ compensation insurance? Workers' compensation is a form of insurance that provides compensation to employees who suffer job-related injuries and illnesses. In exchange for the possession of workers’ compensation insurance, the state offers a legal surrender of the employee's right to sue his or her employer for the tort of negligence. 3.) Why do insurance companies use workers’ compensation class codes? Insurance companies need to be able to categorize various types of work into “class codes” to determine workers compensation rates, coverages, and exclusions. For example, a 5606  (Contractor) will have a more expensive workers’ compensation rate than an 8810 (Clerical) employee, because more dangerous work is being performed. 4.) How is workers’ compensation insurance charged? Insurance companies assign a unique rate to each client based on the applicable class code, the experience and loss history of the business, amount of employees and payroll, and other factors. The rate is charged as a percentage of payroll applied to the taxable wages paid to employees. For example, a road construction company might have nine employees that are classified as 5506. Let’s say those employees have a workers' compensation rate of $12 per 100. That means that for every $100 of taxable wages paid to those employees, the employer is charged $12 for workers compensation insurance. That same company has one 8810 (Clerical) employee. The 8810 employee has a rate of $0.15 per 100. That means that for every $100 of taxable wages paid to that employee, the employer is charged $0.15 for workers’ compensation insurance. 5.) Why is it important to be correctly classified? In the event of an audit (Or injury that leads to an audit), the carrier may determine that employees were incorrectly classified. If so, the insurance company can retroactively bill the client for up to three years of premium that has been incorrectly classified. If employees are misclassified, the claim frequency and loss ratios will be out-of-line with the norm for that class code. Insurance companies use statisticians to keep track of unusual loss patterns and payroll ratios. They will figure it out eventually, possibly resulting in the outcome from bullet point above. Being incorrectly classified can cause insured’s to get dropped by their carrier. Getting dropped puts companies in a frantic rush to find new coverage, meanwhile, the income-producing functions of the business must come to a halt. When a business then tries to get insurance from another carrier, the first question the new insurance company will ask is “Have you recently been dropped or denied coverage?” If this is true, the insurance company will most likely either refuse to quote or markup the rate due to the increased risk. As a business, the best way to save money on workers’ compensation insurance is to build a long, trusting relationship with the carrier. 6.) Why do some states have different class codes for the same type of work? The rules and regulations for workers’ compensation are unique for every state. Most states utilize the NCCI class code system. With states that use NCCI workers’ compensation class codes, the classifications remain almost entirely the same for each of those states (Except for state specials). However, some states do remain independent, or monopolistic. 7.) How to use the NCCI State Reference Guide To see the governing authority for the workers’ compensation class code list of any US state, you can visit the “NCCI State Reference Guide”. After selecting a state from the drop-down menu, the “State Jurisdiction” row will tell you the name of the organization overseeing the classification system. Additionally, the “Policy Data” row will tell you the organization that is in charge of reporting statistical data for their correlating workers’ compensation “Statistical Plan.” 8.) What is the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI)? NCCI is an independent advisory organization that is primarily funded by insurance companies. Most insurance companies use NCCI for various services, such as collecting and analyzing statistical data for workers’ compensation rates. 9.) What is the NCCI Scopes Manual? The NCCI Scopes Manual is used by insurance professionals (Such as underwriters) to identify the class code associated with each type of occupational work. 10.) How to view a free online index of workers’ compensation codes by state. You can view the correlating article for this video at: https://classcodes.com/workers-compensation-class-codes/
Views: 15796 Class Codes
What are general liability class codes? | Class Codes
 
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What are general liability class codes? General liability class codes are numbers that insurance companies use to group insureds into classifications. The rate for each classification reflects the hazards common to those insureds. The purpose of this classification process is to help underwriters match the risk of an insured with the appropriate premium. The most common classification system used by general liability insurance companies is created and maintained by the Insurance Services Office (Or ISO). The Insurance Services Office is a data management and predictive modeling service for insurance companies. The object of the classification procedure is to assign the one basic classification which best describes the business of the insured. Each of the classifications in the ISO manual include all the various types of operations found in the business. It should be remembered that it is the business which is classified, not individual employments, occupations or operations within a business. However, more than one classification assignment may be necessary for risks with multiple business operations. Therefore, it is necessary to determine whether the risk will be considered a single business operation enterprise or a multiple enterprise. Identifying the correct GL class code is essential to make sure that your business is sufficiently covered and quoted at the right rate. Companies in different industries are vulnerable to various types and degrees of risk. For example, a business consultant (ISO CGL Code 41677) is more susceptible to errors that might harm a client’s revenues... ...whereas a carpenter (ISO CGL Code 91340) is more prone to the risk of personal injury. Because each type of business has different liabilities, they require different classifications. You can purchase the ISO CGL guide at verisk.com. Keep in mind that it is not uncommon for insurance companies to use other classification systems such as the NAICS, SIC, or their own in-house system. You can view the article at: https://classcodes.com/general-liability-class-codes/
Views: 4275 Class Codes
The Purpose of NAICS | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - The Purpose of NAICS. This is the first video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://youtu.be/QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR THE PURPOSE OF NAICS Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial by Class Codes. This series is designed to help you become a NAICS code expert. Showing here is a list of all the videos in this series. We have provided links to all of these videos in the description below. Today, we’ll be going over the purpose of NAICS. So what is the purpose of NAICS? The North American Industry Classification System, or “NAICS,” is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Created against the background of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, it is designed to provide common definitions of the industrial structure of the three countries and a common statistical framework to facilitate the analysis of the three economies. NAICS is based on supply-side or production-oriented principles, to ensure that industrial data, classified to NAICS, are suitable for the analysis of production-related issues such as industrial performance. I would like to quickly add that if you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, “like’s” are very much appreciated! Economic statistics describe the behavior and activities of economic transactors and of the transactions that take place among them. The economic transactors for which NAICS is designed are businesses and other organizations engaged in the production of goods and services. They include farms, incorporated and unincorporated businesses and government business enterprises. NAICS is a comprehensive system encompassing all economic activities. It has a hierarchical structure. At the highest level, it divides the economy into 20 sectors. At lower levels, it further distinguishes the different economic activities in which businesses are engaged. NAICS is designed for the compilation of production statistics and, therefore, for the classification of data relating to establishments. It takes into account the specialization of activities generally found at the level of the producing units of businesses. The criteria used to group establishments into industries in NAICS are similarity of input structures, labor skills, and production processes. NAICS can also be used for classifying companies and enterprises. However, when NAICS is used in this way, the following caveat applies: NAICS has not been specially designed to take account the wide range of vertically- or horizontally-integrated activities of large and complex, multi-establishment companies and enterprises. Hence, there will be a few large and complex companies and enterprises whose activities may be spread over the different sectors of NAICS, in such a way that classifying them to one sector will misrepresent the range of their activities. However, in general, a larger proportion of the activities of each complex company and enterprise is more likely to fall within the sector, subsector and industry group levels of the classification than within the industry levels. Hence, the higher levels of the classification are more suitable for the classification of companies and enterprises than are the lower levels. It should also be kept in mind that when businesses are composed of establishments belonging to different NAICS industries, their company- and enterprise-level data will show a different industrial distribution when classified to NAICS, than will their establishment-level data, and the data will not be directly comparable. NAICS has been designed for statistical purposes. Government departments and agencies and other users that use it for administrative, legislative and other non-statistical purposes take responsibility for applying the classification in this manner. Thank you so much for watching! Now that you’ve learned about The Purpose of NAICS, you can continue your journey to become a NAICS code expert by watching the next video in this series, The Historical Background of NAICS.
Views: 253 Class Codes
USA Business Database
 
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How to use the USA Business Database to grow your business. Link to USA Business Database: https://gumroad.com/l/usa-business-database Transcript: Hello, everybody, this is Mike. I'm here to do a little product review for you for the USA business database by class codes, and so we're gonna walk you through what is the database, how do use it, how do you turn your targeted contacts into leads and then those leads into sales. So the first thing you gotta do, and this is what you would experience, as I walk you through the purchase process, is you'd scroll on here and it's an immediate download. You'd click "I want this" here, and it has my email. I would enter my first name, Mike, and it has my card on file otherwise you'd be entering your card and click "pay" and you would either get an email with the downloads or you can just download it right here. So if for some reason you want to go back to it later you will always have the email and you can log in through that email. So we will download, and so you'll see it downloading right down here, and this is a zip file so when it is done we'll have a list of all the CSV downloads, and we'll be able to click on whichever one we want. There's going to be one for each different state and so say I have an Insurance Agency in Dallas Texas. Well, let's suppose I want to use this list to target potential customers in Dallas Texas that might want my insurance services. So I'll say I have a great program for 8810 Workers' Compensation for clerical insurance so we'll start there. So I'm going to open this. Once the file downloads it should pop up just like this I'm gonna view it in this list format. So my insurance agency is in Texas, so that's who I'm going to target for my targeted business list here. So I'm going to open up Texas. These are in CSV format that allows it to be a quicker download. We can convert it to excel once we open it. Excel will allow more functions and like a drop-down menu in particular which is what we're going to be using today. So here is the file, I'm going to expand this. One of the first things you're gonna want to do is click this (Top left corner) to highlight all, "data," and "auto filter." There are a few ways to do that. This is of a Mac, but it should generally be the same way if you're using Microsoft Excel. All these are converted into drop-down menus. So, the other ways you could highlight it, click "data" here, but you can see it is already selected so it won't matter so anyways so I suppose I'm gonna be targeting businesses in Dallas Texas. So what I'm going to to do over here is we're going to select Dallas, this is just for an example, so I'm going to say contains "Dallas." The other way to do it as I could've unselected all and just scrolled all the way down to Dallas and only selected Dallas. So right now we have all these businesses here that are only in Dallas Texas. Well, there's quite a few. There are tons and tons of rows. so anyways we're going to narrow it down more because this is a targeted business list and I want to specify (exactly) who I want to be selling to. This column here is "number of employees." We may not want to do these huge companies because that's not gonna be our target market. so let's say we do all 1, 2, 3 employees... maybe I'll just select "all" and then unselect these humongous ones. Maybe that will be easier. Ok, so now we narrowed it down to business up to, the largest is 249. So now we have a list of companies in Dallas Texas, that are up to 249 employees and it is still just an incredibly humongous list, so we're gonna keep narrowing. We're gonna really target this down into our target market that's really going to give us the most bang for our buck is who do we want to market to, who do we have the best product or service for, who are we most likely to be able to convert a contact, to a lead, to a sale. That's the beauty of this list is it's already here. you don't have to Google, all these different companies and if you happen to know their name Google them by name and find their cities, states, address, domain, contact, first and last name, contact email, what's their a NAICS description what are their insurance cost codes. You don't have to do all that. All that's already ready to go. if you were to try to hire somebody to start googling and get this information online, you could do that. You might pay someone $10 an hour but how long is it gonna take them to compile a targeted list of the specifics that are going to give you the most bang for your buck. Whereas you could just download this USA business database give, them a humongous Headstart, and spend that same money that you would have spent to collect this information and have them go ahead and start your marketing program. (Continued).
Views: 84 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 561621? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-561621/ What is NAICS Code 561621 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in (1) selling security alarm systems, such as burglar and fire alarms, along with installation, repair, or monitoring services or (2) remote monitoring of electronic security alarm systems. Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Selling security alarm systems for buildings, without installation, repair, or monitoring services--are classified in Sector 42, Wholesale Trade, or Sector 44-45, Retail Trade; and • Retailing motor vehicle security systems, with or without installation or repair services--are classified in Industry 441310, Automotive Parts and Accessories Stores.
Views: 47 Class Codes
Defining the Establishment | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - Defining the Establishment in NAICS. This is the sixth video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR DEFINING THE “ESTABLISHMENT” Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial Series by Class Codes. This series is designed to help you become a NAICS code expert. Showing here is a list of all the videos in this series. We have provided links to all of these videos in the description below. Today, we’ll be going over the definition of the “Establishment.” NAICS is a classification system for establishments. The establishment is defined as the smallest operating entity for which records provide information on the cost of inputs - capital, labor, energy, materials, and services - employed to produce the units of output. The output may be sold to other establishments and receipts or sales recorded, or the output may be provided without explicit charge, that is, the good or service may be "sold" within the company itself. The establishment is generally a single physical location, where business is conducted or where services or industrial operations are performed (for example, a factory, mill, store, hotel, movie theatre, mine, farm, airline terminal, sales office, warehouse, or central administrative office). There are cases where records identify distinct and separate economic activities performed at a single physical location (e.g., shops in a hotel). These retailing activities, operated out of the same physical location as the hotel, are identified as separate establishments and classified in retail trade while the hotel is classified in accommodation. In such cases, each activity is treated as a separate establishment provided that: no one industry description in the classification includes such combined activities; separate reports can be prepared on the number of employees, their wages and salaries, sales or receipts, and expenses; and employment and output are significant for both activities. Exceptions to the single location exist for physically dispersed operations, such as construction, transportation, and telecommunications. For these activities, the individual sites, projects, fields, networks, lines, or systems of such dispersed activities are not normally considered to be establishments. The establishment is represented by those relatively permanent main or branch offices, terminals, stations, and so forth, that are either (1) directly responsible for supervising such activities, or (2) the base from which personnel operates to carry out these activities. Although an establishment may be identical with the enterprise (company), the two terms should not be confused. An enterprise (company) may consist of more than one establishment. Such multi-unit enterprises may have establishments in more than one industry in NAICS. If such enterprises have a separate establishment primarily engaged in providing headquarters services, these establishments are classified in NAICS Sector 55, Management of companies and enterprises. Although all establishments have output, they may or may not have receipts. In large enterprises, it is not unusual for establishments to exist to solely serve other establishments of the same enterprise (auxiliary establishments). In such cases, these units often do not collect receipts from the establishments they serve. This type of support activity is found throughout the economy and involves goods-producing activities as well as services. Units that carry out support activities for the enterprise to which they belong are classified, to the extent feasible, according to the NAICS code related to their activity. This means that warehouses providing storage facilities for their own enterprise will be classified as warehouses. If you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, “like’s” are very much appreciated! Thank you so much for watching! Now that you’ve learned about The definition of the “Establishment,” you can continue your journey to become a NAICS code expert by watching the next video in this series, “Determining the Industry Classification of an establishment.”
Views: 93 Class Codes
Historical Background of NAICS | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - The Historical Background of NAICS. This is the second video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF NAICS Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial Series, by Class Codes. Today, we will be going over the historical background of the NAICS classification system. Over the years, there have been many industrial classification systems in North America. The Standard Industrial Classification system, Or SIC, traces its roots to the New Deal era when the Interdepartmental Committee on Industrial Classification was established in 1937 to develop a classification system. The Committee released its first classification of manufacturing industries in 1941, followed by a non-manufacturing classification in 1942. Revisions were made to the system in 1958, 1963, 1967, 1972, 1977, and 1987, which was the last version. These periodic changes were intended to keep pace with changes in the economy so that the system would recognize significant new categories and eliminate ones for trades that were nearly extinct. With inputs from data-gathering agencies such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Office of Management and Budget oversaw the later revisions of the system. I would like to quickly add that if you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, like’s are very much appreciated! Moving on, The Standard Industrial Classification system (SIC) was initially developed to classify establishments by the type of activity in which they are primarily engaged and to promote the comparability of establishment data describing various facets of the U.S. economy. With the SIC classification system, the government was able to establish a more comprehensive and fully-integrated system of economic reporting. The SIC covers the entire field of economic activities by defining industries in accordance with the composition and structure of the economy. The 1948 SIC facilitated data comparability, by providing a framework of standard concepts, terminology, and groupings of industries. The introduction to the 1948 SIC manual stated that it was designed for the classification of the establishment, but a precise definition of “the establishment” was not provided. In the major revision of the SIC in 1960, the importance of the need for a standard unit of observation was emphasized by the provision of a standard definition of the establishment. The variables needed to assemble the "basic industrial statistics" for the analysis of the different sectors of the economy were specified, and the establishment became the smallest unit capable of reporting that set of variables. The 1970’s and 1980’s revisions continued to update the industry groupings to reflect changes in the industrial structure of the economy. The new editions created sector groupings that better drew together single and vertically-integrated companies engaged in the production of similar product groups. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) last updated the SIC in 1987. It was customary to revise the SIC at ten-year intervals; however, by 1990 not all of the economic statistics programs had yet implemented the 1980 SIC manual. It was decided to postpone the revision and to take into account the statistical needs of the North American Free Trade Agreement signed in January 1994. The needs were met by developing NAICS, an industrial classification common to Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The first version, NAICS 1997, was released in March 1998. NAICS was revised for 2002 to achieve increased comparability among the three countries in selected areas and to identify additional industries for new and emerging activities. Additionally, in 2002, Industries were created for Internet services providers, web search portals, and Internet publishing and broadcasting. Changes to the North American economies continue to impact the classification systems. The NAICS classifications do not wait every 10 years to revise classifications, as did the SIC, but rather, continue to update the coding system every five years. As of the date of this video, the most recently published NAICS Classification Manual is 2017, with the next scheduled to be released in 2022.
Views: 101 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 423430? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-423430/ What is NAICS Code 423430 Computer and Computer Peripheral Equipment and Software Merchant Wholesalers This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in the merchant wholesale distribution of computers, computer peripheral equipment, loaded computer boards, and/or computer software. Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Merchant wholesale distribution of modems and other electronic communications equipment--are classified in Industry 423690, Other Electronic Parts and Equipment Merchant Wholesalers; and • Selling, planning, and designing computer systems that integrate computer hardware, software, and communication technologies--are classified in U.S. Industry 541512, Computer Systems Design Services.
Views: 17 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 237310? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-237310/ What is NAICS Code 237310? This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in the construction of highways (including elevated), streets, roads, airport runways, public sidewalks, or bridges. The work performed may include new work, reconstruction, rehabilitation, and repairs. Specialty trade contractors are included in this industry if they are engaged in activities primarily related to highway, street, and bridge construction (e.g., installing guardrails on highways). • Constructing tunnels--are classified in Industry 237990, Other Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction; • Highway lighting and signal installation--are classified in Industry 238210, Electrical Contractors and Other Wiring Installation Contractors; • Painting bridges--are classified in Industry 238320, Painting and Wall Covering Contractors; • Road decommissioning or removing culverts or bridges--are classified in Industry 238910, Site Preparation Contractors; and • Constructing parking lots, private driveways, sidewalks, or erecting billboards--are classified in Industry 238990, All Other Specialty Trade Contractors.
Views: 51 Class Codes
The Structure of NAICS | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - The Structure of NAICS. This is the fifth video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR THE STRUCTURE OF NAICS: Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial Series by Class Codes. This series is designed to help you become a NAICS code expert. Showing here is a list of all the videos in this series. We have provided links to all of these videos in the description below. Today, we’ll be going over the structure of NAICS. The structure of NAICS is hierarchical. The numbering system that has been adopted is a six-digit code, of which the first five digits are used to describe the NAICS levels that will be used by the three countries to produce comparable data. The first two digits designate the sector, the third digit designates the subsector, the fourth digit designates the industry group and the fifth digit designates the industry. The sixth digit is used to designate national industries. A zero as the sixth digit indicates that there is no further national detail. NAICS agreements define the boundaries of the twenty sectors into which the classification divides the economies of the three countries. In general, the use of the same code across the three countries indicates that the class is comparable, even if the title is not identical because of differences in the use of language. NAICS with Canadian detail is designated NAICS Canada while NAICS with the United States’ and Mexico's own six-digit detail are designated NAICS United States and Sistema de Clasificación Industrial de América del Norte México, respectively. Comparability among the three countries is indicated by superscripts at the end of class titles. The abbreviation "CAN" indicates a Canadian-only class, "MEX" indicates that the Canadian and Mexican classes are comparable, and "US" indicates that the Canadian and United States classes are comparable. When no superscript appears, the Canadian, Mexican and United States classes are comparable. If you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, “like’s” are very much appreciated! Thank you so much for watching! Now that you’ve learned about The structure of NAICS, you can continue your journey to become a NAICS code expert by watching the next video in this series, Defining the “Establishment.”
Views: 80 Class Codes
Introduction to the Workers Compensation Classification System
 
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USER LINKS: The Employer’s Workers Compensation Classification Guide: https://gumroad.com/l/workers-compensation-classification-guide VIDEO SCRIPT: Hello, and welcome to the Introduction to the Classification System. This video is an excerpt from "The Employer's Workers Compensation Classification System.", linked in the description below. The workers' compensation classification system was developed to provide an orderly method of grouping similar employers where each workers’ compensation class code would reflect job exposures that are common to insureds in their respective industry. Under the classification system, the business of the insured (the employer) is classified instead of each separate occupation within the company. Most business operations are classified into what is known as the governing classification. The governing classification is the single workers' compensation code that most accurately describes operations being performed by the insured. The classification assigned to an insured can greatly impact the cost an insurer pays for workers’ compensation premiums from the point of classification forward. The code will be essential in determining the premium rate and is used with the experience modifier (the company’s experience rating), and the insured’s payroll per $100. Payroll X Base Rate X Experience Modifier = Premium The workers' compensation classification system is different than the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) and the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Many insurance professionals do not entirely understand all the nuances of the classification system. Employers tend to solely rely on the knowledge and expertise of their insurance agent. This is acceptable if you have an experienced and knowledgeable agent that truly understands the specifics and day-to-day operations of an insureds business. But many times, nobody knows the business of the insured better than the business owner, and there are many pitfalls that could be avoided if the business owner had a strong grasp of the classification process. The efforts of even the best insurance agent can be improved with the help of a knowledgeable and informed insured. Insurance underwriters are much savvier in catching classification mistakes that are costing them money. They continuously monitor their loss history with each client, searching for red flags that would indicate more dangerous work is being performed than is allowed by an assigned class code. However, they do not necessarily search for loss history that would suggest the insured is paying for higher risk than their exposure. Continue watching this series to learn more about the workers compensation classification system, and to equip yourself with knowledge that could help you avoid costly mistakes in the present and future. In the next video, we will learn about NCCI and the Scopes Manual. And of course, likes and follow's are very much appreciated!
Views: 95 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 524128? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-524128/ What is NAICS Code 524128 Other Direct Insurance (except Life, Health, and Medical) Carriers This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in initially underwriting (e.g., assuming the risk, assigning premiums) insurance policies (except life, disability income, accidental death and dismemberment, health and medical, property and casualty, and title insurance policies). Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Reinsuring insurance policies--are classified in Industry 524130, Reinsurance Carriers; • Initially underwriting annuities and life insurance policies, disability income insurance policies, and accidental death and dismemberment insurance policies--are classified in U.S. Industry 524113, Direct Life Insurance Carriers; • Initially underwriting health and medical insurance policies--are classified in U.S. Industry 524114, Direct Health and Medical Insurance Carriers; • Initially underwriting property and casualty insurance policies--are classified in U.S. Industry 524126, Direct Property and Casualty Insurance Carriers; and • Initially underwriting title insurance policies--are classified in U.S. Industry 524127, Direct Title Insurance Carriers.
Views: 9 Class Codes
The Development of NAICS | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - The Development of NAICS. This is the third video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF NAICS: Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial by Class Codes. This series is designed to help you become a NAICS code expert. Showing here is a list of all the videos in this series. We have provided links to all of these videos in the description below. Today, we’ll be going over the development of NAICS. NAICS was developed by the ECPC (Economic Classification Policy Committee) of the United States Office of Management and Budget, along with Statistics Canada, and Mexico's INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía). The three countries agreed upon four pillars in which the conceptual framework and principles of the new system would be developed. * The first pillar of the Economic Classification Policy Committee was that NAICS would be based on a production-oriented or supply-based conceptual framework. This means that producing units using similar production processes would be grouped together in NAICS. * Second, special attention would be given to developing production-oriented classifications for * (a) new and emerging industries * (b) service industries in general and * (c) industries engaged in the production of advanced technologies. * Third, time-series continuity would be maintained to the extent possible. However, changes in the economy and proposals from data users would be considered. In addition, in order to create a common system for all three countries, adjustments would be made where the United States, Canada, and Mexico had incompatible definitions. * And fourth, in the interest of a wider range of international comparisons, the three countries would strive for greater compatibility with the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC Revision 3). I would like to quickly add that if you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, “like’s” are very much appreciated! Moving on, in effort to assist with the development of NAICS, a user committee meeting was called in November 1994. The meeting included governmental organizations, economists, and business and trade associations from each country. A coordinating committee and subcommittees, which covered agriculture, mining, manufacturing, construction, distribution networks, finance, insurance, real estate, business services, personal services, health services, social assistance, and public administration, all worked together to help develop the proposed structure of NAICS. Proposals from all three countries concerning individual industries were considered for acceptance if the proposed industry was based on the production-oriented concept of the system. The structure of NAICS was developed and accepted by Statistics Canada, INEGI and the Office of Management and Budget of the United States on December 10, 1996. Thank you so much for watching! Now that you’ve learned about The Development of NAICS, you can continue your journey to become a NAICS code expert by watching the next video in this series, The Conceptual Framework of NAICS.
Views: 54 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 447110? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-447110/ What is NAICS Code 447110 Gasoline Stations with Convenience Stores This industry comprises establishments engaged in retailing automotive fuels (e.g., diesel fuel, gasohol, gasoline) in combination with convenience store or food mart items. These establishments can either be in a convenience store (i.e., food mart) setting or a gasoline station setting. These establishments may also provide automotive repair services. Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Retailing automotive fuels without a convenience store--are classified in Industry 447190, Other Gasoline Stations; and • Retailing a limited line of goods, known as convenience stores or food marts (except those with fuel pumps)--are classified in Industry 445120, Convenience Stores.
Views: 14 Class Codes
Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - Determining the NAICS Industry Classification of the “Establishment.” This is the final video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR DETERMINING THE INDUSTRY CLASSIFICATION OF AN ESTABLISHMENT Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial Series by Class Codes. Today, we will be learning how to determine the industry classification of an establishment. An establishment is classified to an industry when its principal activity meets the definition for that industry. This is a straightforward determination for establishments engaged in a single activity, but where establishments are engaged in more than one activity, it is necessary to establish procedures for identifying its principal activity. In cases where there is more than one activity, the industry code is assigned based on the relative share of value-added. The activity with the largest value-added is identified as the establishment's principal activity, and the establishment is classified to the industry corresponding to that activity. For example, if the value added within an establishment consists of 40% from manufacturing dishwashers, 30% from manufacturing airspeed instruments and 30% from assembling clocks, it will be classified to NAICS 335223, Major kitchen appliance manufacturing. The assignment of the industry code is performed at the 6-digit level of the classification. In most cases, when an establishment is engaged in more than one activity, the activities are treated independently. However, in some cases, the activities are treated in combination. There are two types of combined activities that are given special attention in NAICS. They are vertical integration and joint production (horizontal integration). These combined activities have an economic basis and occur in both goods-producing and services-producing sectors. In some cases, there are efficiencies to be gained from combining certain activities in the same establishment. Some of these combinations occur so commonly or frequently that their combination can be treated as a third activity in its own right and explicitly classified in a specific industry. One approach to classifying these activities would be to use the primary activity rule, that is, whichever activity is the largest. However, the fundamental principle of NAICS is that establishments that employ the same production process should be classified in the same industry. If the premise that the combined activities correspond to a distinct third activity is accepted, then using the primary activity rule would place establishments performing the same combination of activities in different industries, thereby violating the production principle of NAICS. The second reason for NAICS recognizing combined activities is to improve the stability of establishment classification, both over time and among the various parties that implement the classification. An establishment should remain classified in the same industry unless its production process changes and different parties should code the same establishment or type of establishment in the same way. A consistent treatment of establishments with combined activities is more likely if they are classified to a single industry. Vertical integration involves consecutive stages of fabrication or production processes in which the output of one step is the input of the next. In general, establishments will be classified based on the final process in a vertically-integrated production environment, unless specifically identified as classified in another industry. For example, paper may be produced either by establishments that first produce pulp and then consume that pulp to produce paper or by those establishments producing paper from purchased pulp. NAICS specifies that both of these types of paper-producing processes should be classified in NAICS 32212, Paper mills, rather than in NAICS 32211, Pulp mills. In other cases, NAICS specifies that vertically-integrated establishments be classified in the industry representing the first stage of the manufacturing process.
Views: 121 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 923130? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-923130/ What is NAICS Code 923130 Administration of Human Resource Programs (except Education, Public Health, and Veterans' Affairs Programs) This industry comprises government establishments primarily engaged in the planning, administration, and coordination of programs for public assistance, social work, and welfare activities. The administration of Social Security, disability insurance, Medicare, unemployment insurance, and workers' compensation programs are included in this industry. Cross-References. Government establishments primarily engaged in-- • Administering veterans' programs--are classified in Industry 923140, Administration of Veterans' Affairs; • Operating state employment job service offices--are classified in U.S. Industry 561311, Employment Placement Agencies; and • Operating programs for public assistance, social work, and welfare--are classified in Subsector 624, Social Assistance.
Views: 9 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 484110? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-484110/ What is NAICS Code 484110 General Freight Trucking, Local This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local general freight trucking. General freight trucking establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Local general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking within a metropolitan area which may cross state lines. Generally the trips are same-day return. Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Operating independent trucking terminals--are classified in Industry 488490, Other Support Activities for Road Transportation; and • Providing general freight long-distance trucking including all North American international travel--are classified in Industry 48412, General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance.
Views: 29 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 311920? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-311920/ What is NAICS Code 311920? This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in one or more of the following: (1) roasting coffee; (2) manufacturing coffee and tea concentrates (including instant and freeze-dried); (3) blending tea; (4) manufacturing herbal tea; and (5) manufacturing coffee extracts, flavorings, and syrups. Cross-References. • Establishments primarily engaged in bottling and canning iced tea are classified in U.S. Industry 312111, Soft Drink Manufacturing.
Views: 35 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 311211? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-311211/ What is NAICS Code 311211? This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in (1) milling flour or meal from grains (except rice) or vegetables and/or (2) milling flour and preparing flour mixes or doughs. • Preparing breakfast cereals from flour milled in the same establishment--are classified in Industry 311230, Breakfast Cereal Manufacturing; • Manufacturing prepared flour mixes or doughs from flour ground elsewhere--are classified in U.S. Industry 311824, Dry Pasta, Dough, and Flour Mixes Manufacturing from Purchased Flour; • Milling rice or cleaning and polishing rice--are classified in U.S. Industry 311212, Rice Milling; • Wet milling corn and vegetables--are classified in U.S. Industry 311221, Wet Corn Milling; and • Crushing soybeans and extracting soybean oil--are classified in U.S. Industry 311224, Soybean and Other Oilseed Processing.
Views: 17 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 921110? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-921110/ What is NAICS Code 921110 Executive Offices This industry comprises government establishments serving as offices of chief executives and their advisory committees and commissions. This industry includes offices of the president, governors, and mayors, in addition to executive advisory commissions.
Views: 43 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 238350? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-238350/ What is NAICS Code 238350? This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in finish carpentry work. The work performed may include new work, additions, alterations, maintenance, and repairs. • Installing skylights--are classified in Industry 238160, Roofing Contractors; • Framing--are classified in Industry 238130, Framing Contractors; and • Building custom kitchen and bath cabinets (except freestanding) in a shop--are classified in Industry 337110, Wood Kitchen Cabinet and Countertop Manufacturing.
Views: 35 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 111140? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-111140/ What is NAICS Code 111140? This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in growing wheat and/or producing wheat seeds. Establishments growing wheat in combination with oilseed(s) with the wheat or oilseed(s) not accounting for one-half of the establishment's agricultural production (value of crops for market) are classified in U.S. Industry 111191, Oilseed and Grain Combination Farming.
Views: 6 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 533110? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-533110/ What is NAICS Code 533110 Lessors of Nonfinancial Intangible Assets (except Copyrighted Works) This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in assigning rights to assets, such as patents, trademarks, brand names, and/or franchise agreements, for which a royalty payment or licensing fee is paid to the asset holder. Cross-References. • Establishments primarily engaged in producing, reproducing, and/or distributing copyrighted works are classified in Sector 51, Information; • Independent artists, writers, and performers primarily engaged in creating copyrighted works are classified in Industry 711510, Independent Artists, Writers, and Performers; • Establishments primarily engaged in leasing real property are classified in Subsector 531, Real Estate; • Establishments primarily engaged in leasing tangible assets, such as automobiles, computers, consumer goods, and industrial machinery and equipment, are classified in Subsector 532, Rental and Leasing Services; and • Establishments that allow franchisees the use of the franchise name, contingent on the franchisee buying products or services from the franchisor, are classified elsewhere.
Views: 23 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 511191? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-511191/ What is NAICS Code 511191 Greeting Card Publishers This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in publishing greeting cards. Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Publishing greeting cards exclusively on the Internet--are classified in Industry 519130, Internet Publishing and Broadcasting and Web Search Portals; and • Printing greeting cards without publishing--are classified in Industry 32311, Printing.
Views: 4 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 611513? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-611513/ What is NAICS Code 611513 Apprenticeship Training This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in offering apprenticeship training programs. These programs involve applied training as well as course work.
Views: 9 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 221118? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-221118/ What is NAICS Code 221118? This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in operating electric power generation facilities (except hydroelectric, fossil fuel, nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass). These facilities convert other forms of energy, such as tidal power, into electric energy. The electric energy produced in these establishments is provided to electric power transmission systems or to electric power distribution systems. • Operating trash disposal incinerators that also generate electricity--are classified in U.S. Industry 562213, Solid Waste Combustors and Incinerators; • Operating hydroelectric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221111, Hydroelectric Power Generation; • Operating fossil fuel powered electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221112, Fossil Fuel Electric Power Generation; • Operating nuclear electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221113, Nuclear Electric Power Generation; • Operating solar electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221114, Solar Electric Power Generation; • Operating wind electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221115, Wind Electric Power Generation; • Operating geothermal electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221116, Geothermal Electric Power Generation; and • Operating biomass electric power generation facilities--are classified in U.S. Industry 221117, Biomass Electric Power Generation.
Views: 40 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 311212? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-311212/ What is NAICS Code 311212? This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in one of the following: (1) milling rice; (2) cleaning and polishing rice; or (3) milling, cleaning, and polishing rice. The establishments in this industry may package the rice they mill with other ingredients. • Drying and/or dehydrating ingredients and packaging them with purchased rice--are classified in U.S. Industry 311423, Dried and Dehydrated Food Manufacturing; and • Mixing purchased dried and/or dehydrated ingredients with purchased rice--are classified in U.S. Industry 311999, All Other Miscellaneous Food Manufacturing.
Views: 4 Class Codes
The Conceptual Framework of NAICS | Class Codes
 
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NAICS Code Tutorial Series - The Conceptual Framework of NAICS. This is the fourth video of a seven-part series designed to help viewers better understand the NAICS classification system. USER LINKS: (1/7) The Purpose of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0c0efVVVLU (2/7) Historical Background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJlMZM3LW7s (3/7) Development of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkix70UJsI (4/7) Conceptual Framework of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFA8CLX2Gw (5/7) Structure of NAICS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1JuEvYm_rI (6/7) Defining the "Establishment": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=059pQaafAQk (7/7) Determining Industry Classification of the Establishment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKA6WaKTnc0 SCRIPT FOR THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF NAICS Hello, and welcome to the NAICS Code Tutorial Series by Class Codes. This series is designed to help you become a NAICS code expert. Showing here is a list of all the videos in this series. We have provided links to all of these videos in the description below. Today, we’ll be going over the conceptual framework of NAICS. NAICS is based on a production-oriented, or supply-based conceptual framework in which establishments are grouped into industries according to the similarity in the production processes used to produce goods and services. The production process refers to the combination of inputs - such as capital, labor, energy, materials, and services - used in the production of outputs (I.E. Goods and services). A production-oriented industry classification system ensures that statistical agencies in the three countries can produce information on inputs and outputs, industrial performance, productivity, unit labor costs, employment, and other statistics that reflect structural changes occurring in the three economies. The boundaries that differentiate industries, in principle, will have differences in input structures and production technologies. This means that, in the language of economics, producing units within an industry have similar production functions that differ from those of producing units in other industries. I would like to quickly add that if you have any questions regarding this video, please ask in the comment section below. And of course, “like’s” are very much appreciated! Moving on, the unit of observation of the industrial classification is the producing unit or establishment. The industrial classification groups these producing units, not products. Grouping producing units in this way enable the collection of data on inputs and outputs on a comparable basis. Because establishments each produce a number of products in different combinations and using different technologies, it is hardly possible to group all the establishments producing a particular product. Therefore, it is more useful to use a production-oriented approach to group establishments into industries based on common input structures. This method permits the compilation of comprehensive data on the total output of each product by industry and across all industries. In contrast, the various versions of the SIC and of the ISIC (International Standard Industrial Classification) have used mixed criteria to create the industries of the classification. Thank you so much for watching! Now that you’ve learned about The Conceptual Framework of NAICS, you can continue your journey to become a NAICS code expert by watching the next video in this series, The Structure of NAICS.
Views: 54 Class Codes
What is NAICS Code 334519? | Class Codes
 
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https://classcodes.com/lookup/naics-code-334519/ What is NAICS Code 334519? This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing measuring and controlling devices (except search, detection, navigation, guidance, aeronautical, and nautical instruments and systems; automatic environmental controls for residential, commercial, and appliance use; instruments for measurement, display, and control of industrial process variables; totalizing fluid meters and counting devices; instruments for measuring and testing electricity and electrical signals; analytical laboratory instruments; irradiation equipment; and electromedical and electrotherapeutic apparatus). Illustrative Examples: • Aircraft engine instruments manufacturing • Automotive emissions testing equipment manufacturing • Clocks assembling • Meteorological instruments manufacturing • Physical properties testing and inspection equipment manufacturing • Polygraph machines manufacturing • Radiation detection and monitoring instruments manufacturing • Surveying instruments manufacturing • Thermometers, liquid-in-glass and bimetal types (except medical), manufacturing • Watches and parts (except crystals) manufacturing Cross-References. Establishments primarily engaged in-- • Manufacturing medical thermometers--are classified in U.S. Industry 339112, Surgical and Medical Instrument Manufacturing; • Manufacturing search, detection, navigation, guidance, aeronautical, and nautical systems and instruments--are classified in U.S. Industry 334511, Search, Detection, Navigation, Guidance, Aeronautical, and Nautical System and Instrument Manufacturing; • Manufacturing automatic controls and regulators for applications, such as heating, air-conditioning, refrigeration and appliances--are classified in U.S. Industry 334512, Automatic Environmental Control Manufacturing for Residential, Commercial, and Appliance Use; • Manufacturing instruments and related devices that measure, display, or control (i.e., monitor or analyze) industrial process variables--are classified in U.S. Industry 334513, Instruments and Related Products Manufacturing for Measuring, Displaying, and Controlling Industrial Process Variables; • Manufacturing totalizing (i.e., registering) fluid meters and counting devices, including motor vehicle gauges--are classified in U.S. Industry 334514, Totalizing Fluid Meter and Counting Device Manufacturing; • Manufacturing instruments for measuring and testing the characteristics of electricity and electrical signals--are classified in U.S. Industry 334515, Instrument Manufacturing for Measuring and Testing Electricity and Electrical Signals; • Manufacturing instruments for laboratory analysis of the physical composition or concentration of samples of solid, fluid, gaseous, or composite materials--are classified in U.S. Industry 334516, Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing; • Manufacturing X-ray apparatus, tubes, or related irradiation apparatus--are classified in U.S. Industry 334517, Irradiation Apparatus Manufacturing; • Manufacturing electromedical and electrotherapeutic apparatus--are classified in U.S. Industry 334510, Electromedical and Electrotherapeutic Apparatus Manufacturing; • Manufacturing glass watch and clock crystals--are classified in Industry 32721, Glass and Glass Product Manufacturing; • Manufacturing plastics watch and clock crystals--are classified in U.S. Industry 326199, All Other Plastics Product Manufacturing; and • Manufacturing timing relays--are classified in U.S. Industry 335314, Relay and Industrial Control Manufacturing.
Views: 22 Class Codes