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Videos uploaded by user “engineerguy”
How a quartz watch works
 
03:34
The amazing everyday wristwatch: We never think about it, but only because engineers have made it so reliable and durable that we don't need to. At its heart lies a tiny tuning fork made of the mineral quartz. In this video Bill takes apart a cheap watch and shows extreme close-ups of the actually tunings fork. He explains how the piezoelectric effect of quartz lies at the heart of the watch's operation.
Views: 973821 engineerguy
Coffee Maker: Pumping water with no moving parts
 
02:40
Bill takes apart a coffee maker to show how hot water is pumped through it using a "bubble pump." The use of this pump reflects an engineer's choice to have only one heating element to lower the cost.
Views: 857159 engineerguy
What Keeps Nuclear Weapons from Proliferating: The hardest step in making a nuclear bomb
 
04:39
Bill explains that the hardest step is making the proper type of uranium. Weapons and power plants require uranium that contains a greater amount of the isotope uranium-235 than found in natural uranium, which is mostly uranium-238. He outlines the key difficulty in separating the two isotope: They have nearly identical properties. He explains the two key methods for separation: Gas diffusion and centrifuges.
Views: 994289 engineerguy
Why the Dvorak keyboard didn't take over the world
 
03:49
Perhaps no technological failure is better known than that of the Dvorak keyboard. Since the early 1870s nearly every typewriter used a keyboard with a QWERTY layout, yet most studies show the Dvorak arrangement of keys to be faster. This videos probes the underlying reasons that this arrangement failed to make headway in the marketplace. This video tells the story of why the Dvorak keyboard failed. This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects. http://www.engineerguy.com/failure.
Views: 916993 engineerguy
How a lead-acid battery works
 
04:56
Bill explains the essential principles of a lead-acid battery. He shows the inside of motorcycle lead-acid battery, removes the lead and lead-oxide plates and shows how they generate a 2 volt potential difference when placed in sulfuric acid. He explains how the build up of lead sulfate between the plates will make the battery unusable if it discharged completely, which leads him to a description of how to make a deep cycle battery used for collecting solar energy. You can find the status of future video series at this link: http://engineerguy-ideas.wikispaces.com/Current+status+of+series+in+production
Views: 564411 engineerguy
How an atomic clock works, and its use in the global positioning system (GPS)
 
04:33
Bill shows the world's smallest atomic clock and then describes how the first one made in the 1950s worked. He describes in detail the use of cesium vapor to create a feedback or control loop to control a quartz oscillator. He highlights the importance of atomic team by describing briefly how a GPS receiver uses four satellites to find its position. You can learn more about atomic clocks and the GPS system in the EngineerGuy team's new book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories http://www.engineerguy.com/elements
Views: 805110 engineerguy
NERF Blaster:  Air Restriction Mechanism
 
02:52
Bill reveals the engineering design of a NERF blaster, including how it shoots only one dart at a time using a novel air restriction mechanism. Links mentioned int he video View Steve's original video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4he8Pfywd0 You can become an advanced viewer at www.engineerguy.com/preview
Views: 1206214 engineerguy
How the first transistor worked
 
04:46
Bill uses a replica of the point contact transistor built by Walter Brattain and John Bardeen at Bell Labs. On December 23, 1947 they used this device to amplify the output of a microphone and thus started the microelectronics revolution that changed the world. He describes in detail why a transistor works by highlighting the uniqueness of semiconductors in being able to transfer charge by positive and negative carriers.
Views: 560350 engineerguy
How a Microwave Oven Works
 
05:11
Bill details how a microwave oven heats food. He describes how the microwave vacuum tube, called a magnetron, generates radio frequencies that cause the water in food to rotate back and forth. He shows the standing wave inside the oven, and notes how you can measure the wavelength with melted cheese. He concludes by describing how a magnetron generates radio waves. You can learn more about the microwave oven from the EngineerGuy team's new book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories http://www.engineerguy.com/elements
Views: 2801999 engineerguy
The Ingenious Design of the Aluminum Beverage Can
 
11:39
Bill details the engineering choices underlying the design of a beverage can He explains why it is cylindrical, outlines the manufacturing steps needed to created the can, notes why the can narrows near it lid, show close ups of the double-seam that hold the lid on, and details the complex operation of the tab that opens the can. ☛ Links to additional videos: Rexam: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dK1VVtja5c How It’s Made: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7Y0zAzoggY Anim1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WU_iSQa37aA Anim2:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcsDxCagWrY Drawing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DF4v-phuneI Redrawing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUAijpuzwCU
Views: 8185282 engineerguy
Why the other line is likely to move faster
 
03:43
Bill reveals how "queueing theory" - developed by engineers to route phone calls - can be used to find the most efficient arrangement of cashiers and check out lines. He reports on the work of Agner Erlang, a Danish engineer who, at the opening of the 20th century, helped the Copenhagen Telephone Company provide the best level of service at the lowest price.
Views: 1097083 engineerguy
IBM Selectric Typewriter & its digital to analogue converter
 
03:05
Using slow motion video Bill Hammack, the engineer guy, shows how IBM's revolutionary "golf ball" typewriter works. He describes the marvelous completely mechanical digital-to-analogue converter that translates the discrete impulse of the keys to the rotation of the type element. (This is the typewriter featured on the television series Mad Men.)
Views: 699096 engineerguy
Black box: Inside a flight data recorder
 
02:15
Bill opens up a vintage "black box" from a Delta airlines jetliner. He describes how the box withstands high temperatures and crash velocities because it is made from Inconel: A superalloy steels that is used in furnaces and others extreme environments. The flight data recorder he shows is a Sundstrand FA-542 and was likely used on a DC-9 in the 1970s, although it could have been used as late as 1988 on a Boeing 727.
Views: 534861 engineerguy
How a Smartphone Knows Up from Down (accelerometer)
 
04:25
Bill takes apart a smartphone and explains how its accelerometer works. He also shares the essential idea underlying the MEMS production of these devices.This video is based on a chapter from the EngineerGuy team's latest book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories (Learn more at http://www.engineerguy.com/elements)
Views: 1518237 engineerguy
How Sony's Betamax lost to JVC's VHS Cassette Recorder
 
03:49
In 1976 Sony introduced the Betamax video cassette recorder. It catalyzed the "on demand" of today by allowing users to record television shows, and the machine ignited the first "new media" intellectual property battles. In only a decade this revolutionary machine disappeared, beaten by JVS's version of the cassette recorder. This video tells the story of why Betamax failed. This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects. http://www.engineerguy.com/failure.
Views: 1681309 engineerguy
Fiber optic cables: How they work
 
05:36
Bill uses a bucket of propylene glycol to show how a fiber optic cable works and how engineers send signal across oceans. More info at http://www.engineerguy.com. You can translate captions at http://www.engineerguy.com/translate
Views: 3701344 engineerguy
Hard drive teardown
 
05:04
Bill opens up a computer hard drive to show how it is engineered. He describes how the "head" reads the magnetic information on the disk; reveals how a voice coil motor and a slider controls the position of that head. He also discusses how smooth a disk must be, and briefly mentions a mathematical technique that allows engineers to pack more information on a drive.
Views: 1062282 engineerguy
LCD Monitor Teardown
 
04:53
Bill takes apart an LCD monitor and shows how it works. He explains how it uses liquid crystals, thin film transistors and polarizers to display information. EngineerGuy's new book is at http://www.engineerguy.com/elements.
Views: 1456566 engineerguy
How a Laser Works
 
04:53
Bill shows how the three key characteristics of laser light - single wavelength, narrow beam, and high intensity - are made. He explains the operation of a ruby laser - the first laser ever made - showing how electronic transitions create stimulated emission to give coherent light, and then how the ends of the ruby cavity create a narrow wavelength highly collimated beam. You can learn more about laser in the EngineerGuy team's new book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories http://www.engineerguy.com/elements
Views: 1969698 engineerguy
CCD: The heart of a digital camera (how a charge-coupled device works)
 
04:27
Bill takes apart a digital camera and explains how its captures images using a CCD (charge coupled device). He also shares how a single CCD is used with a color filter array to create colored images. This video is based on a chapter from the EngineerGuy team's latest book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories (Learn more at http://www.engineerguy.com/elements)
Views: 491366 engineerguy
Why it takes a while to make engineerguy videos
 
03:05
This video contains a short announcement about the companion book for engineerguy series #4 (due out soon) plus outtakes. You can learn more about the companion book at http://www.engineerguy.com/elements
Views: 161722 engineerguy
Apollo: The Alignment Optical Telescope
 
04:26
Bill describes the Alignment Optical Telescope used in the Lunar Module on the Apollo missions to the moon. This telescope took star sightings which were used to align the Module's guidance system. Bill shows how the telescope used an Archimedes spiral inscribed on its eyepiece to replace the heavy motors, worm gears, and rigid tracks used in a traditional sextant -- this shaved weight from the Lunar Module and allowed it to carry more fuel. You can bundle watch Bill's videos using this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0INsTTU1k2UO-2-AwomFmAs4nuZU9ht3 If you are interested in mechanical computers you'll likely enjoy his series on Albert Michelson's Harmonic Analyzer -- a 19th century machine that calculates Fourier transforms: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0INsTTU1k2UYO9Mck-i5HNqGNW5AeEwq
Views: 318827 engineerguy
How smoke detectors work
 
03:45
Bill takes apart a smoke detector and shows how it uses a radioactive source to generate a tiny current which is disrupted when smoke flows through the sensor. He describes how a special transistor called a MOSFET can be used to detect the tiny current changes.
Views: 597335 engineerguy
Light bulb filament
 
03:38
Bill takes apart an incandescent to show how the tungsten filament is made. He shows it in extreme close-up and also discusses the material processing needed to produce ductile tungsten.
Views: 683134 engineerguy
Anodizing (Or the beauty of corrosion)
 
04:17
Bill describes how metals like aluminum and titanium are made resistant to corrosion by growing an oxide layer into the metals. These is the same process used on many Apple products. This video is based on a chapter in the book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories; learn more at http://www.engineerguy.com/elements.
Views: 874804 engineerguy
The Cigarette machine: the invention with the greatest economic impact?
 
02:41
Bill nominates, perhaps only provocatively, James Bosnack's cigarette machine as the invention with the greatest economic impact on the 20th century. Cigarettes, as compared to pipes and cigars, are and the most direct way to deliver nicotine to the brain. Bosnack's machine made the mass production of cigarettes possible. The use of cigarettes, of course, has taken a tremendous human and economic toll. (The quotations are from Tastes of Paradise by Wolfgang Shivelbusch published by Pantheon, New York, 1992.)
Views: 260340 engineerguy
PicturePhone: How Bell Telephone lost a half billion, but nearly created the internet
 
03:59
How Bell Telephone's PicturePhone, introduced in 1964, flopped yet nearly catalyzed the internet. Technically, it was an amazing achievement: Bell used the existing twisted-pair copper wire of the telephone network -- not broadband lines like today -- to produce black and white video on a screen about five inches square. And, amazingly for the time, it used a CCD-based-camera. It was meant to be the most revolutionary communication medium of the century, driving subscribers to purchase broadband lines, but failed miserably as a consumer product costing Bell a half billion dollars. This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects. http://www.engineerguy.com/failure.
Views: 441092 engineerguy
Plastic Injection Molding
 
09:37
Bill details the key engineering principles underlying plastic injection molding. He describes its history and, then, reveals the intricate details of the process. He shows viewers where to found, on any injection-molding product, the markings created by injection molding. He closes with a description of the one of the finest examples of the injection molding: the Lego brick. Overview video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUthHS3MTdA Mold manufacture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seZqq1qxW30 Plastic bottle cap production: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHwTHarf8Ck Making Lego bricks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnRRDIFNxoM 99 Percent Invisible: http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-post-billiards-age/
Views: 2102025 engineerguy
RMS Titanic: Fascinating Engineering Facts
 
11:28
Bill shares fascinating images and information gleaned from the 1909 to 1911 editions of the Journal The Engineer. It includes photos of the construction of the Titanic and its twin the Olympic, the launching of these Olympic-class ships, and accidents that occurred. The video includes engineering details of the ship’s engines, steering mechanism, and propellers. Become an advanced viewer and help review early drafts of new videos: http://www.engineerguy.com/support/
Views: 2129313 engineerguy
How home air conditioning triumphed over the open air movement
 
02:31
Bill explains how the rise of home air conditioning had to battle the open air movements in public school: They regarded it as only for factories where it was first introduced. Only when movie theatres added air conditioning in the 1930 and 1940s did it become popular for the home.
Views: 530095 engineerguy
Stories of Technological Failure: PicturePhone, Dvorak keyboard & Betamax
 
02:12
Introduction to a short series of three videos that takes a "snackable" look at the failure of three famous engineered objects: The Bell System's PicturePhone, which lost the company a half billion dollars, but nearly created the internet; the Dvorak keyboard, which is faster than our current QWERTY arrangement, but failed to gain traction in the marketplace; and the technically superb Betamax video cassette recorder, which lost to an inferior VHS-format machine. Transcripts at http://www.engineerguy.com/failure
Views: 152688 engineerguy
Kodak: How George Eastman revolutionized photography
 
02:53
Bill tells the story of how George Eastman invented film. Its use in the Brownie camera revolutionized photography; that it changed the way American families think of themselves and recall their own histories.
Views: 182263 engineerguy
Coffee makers: How baseball put them in our homes
 
03:27
Bill describes how the household drip coffee maker evolved. This was originally broadcast on August 29, 2000. Visit this link to view complete list of media attributions: http://goo.gl/fmGESM. Watch the related EngineerGuy video on how a drip coffee maker works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4j4Q_YBRJEI
Views: 306715 engineerguy
How the Donner Party inspired food packaging
 
03:07
Bill tells us about packaging, a sub-discipline of engineering that is essential to our society. This radio commentary was originally broadcast on November 30, 2004. Visit this link to view complete list of media attributions http://goo.gl/fmGESM.
Views: 191258 engineerguy
Pop Can Stay-on Tab (slow motion)
 
02:18
Using slow motion video Bill Hammack shows the ingenious engineering design of a pop can stay-on tab. To use the least amount of material it was designed to change, while in motion, from a 2nd to a 1st class lever.
Views: 205437 engineerguy
The Whiffletree: A mechanical digital-to-analog converter
 
02:29
Early calculating devices and computers used mechanical digital to analogue converters. This video describes one based on an arrangement of metal bars called a "whiffletree" - also sometimes called a "whippletree." It shows, briefly, the whiffletree used in IBM's revolutionary selectric typewriter and then illustrates the principles of a whiffletree converter by showing the simplest one - one that encodes digital impulses into two bits of information. (This videos is an appendix to Bill Hammack's video about the operation of the Selectric Typewriter.)
Views: 130388 engineerguy
The Engineering of the Drinking Bird
 
10:28
Bill reveals the operation and engineering design underlying the famous drinking bird toy. In this video he explores the role played by the water the bird "drinks," shows what is under the bird's hat and demonstrates that it can operate using heat from a light bulb or by "drinking" whiskey. You can find more of Bill's videos and his books at www.engineerguy.com.
Views: 729010 engineerguy
How a Retractable Ballpoint Pen Works
 
04:44
A ballpoint pen seems simple: press a button you can write, press again and put it in your pocket. Yet inside a clever mechanisms turns that simple push into all sorts of other motions. This video uses detailed animation to look inside the iconic Parker Jotter ink pen and see how it works. You can become an advanced viewer of engineerguy videos by signing up at http://www.engineerguy.com/preview.
Views: 929912 engineerguy
(1/4) Intro/History: Introducing a 100-year-old mechanical computer
 
03:39
► Learn more at: http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier ► Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983966176/ ► Buy the posters on Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/engineerguy ► Main videos in the series: (2/4) Synthesis:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KmVDxkia_w (3/4) Analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dW6VYXp9HM (4/4) Operation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfH-NbsmvD4 ► Bonus videos: Books and Posters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXgTwrblClQ Page-by-Page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMHw9GCAtE8 Spinning Machine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPQwKRt4Y2k Rocker Arms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mBuyixt22U This introduction to the series Albert Michelson’s Harmonic Analyzer celebrates a nineteenth century mechanical computer that performed Fourier analysis by using gears, springs and levers to calculate with sines and cosines—an astonishing feat in an age before electronic computers. Check out the series companion book and learn how to get a free PDF of the entire book at http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier.
Views: 352040 engineerguy
Nitinol: The Shape Memory Effect and Superelasticity
 
09:42
Bill demonstrates the temperature-dependent shape memory of nitinol metal. He explains how "twinning" in the crystal structure of nitinol produces the memory effect. He shows a nitinol-based engine that is powered by temperature differences. He closes the video with a description of superelasticity, a phenomenon related to the memory effect, which he demonstrates with a cardiac stent. (This video is dedicated to my second son: born right after the rough draft was finished, and who, thus, delayed the filming of the final video by eight months.)
Views: 259679 engineerguy
How a Film Projector Works
 
08:50
Bill tears apart a film projector to reveal the amazing mechanisms used in the pre-digital age to trick the mind into seeing a moving image. He uses high speed photography and animations to show how the projector moves the film intermittently, how a shutter strategically blocks light as the film moves, and how the photo sensor reads the sound. He explains how all these mechanisms are synced. You can become an advanced viewer of engineerguy videos by signing up at http://www.engineerguy.com/preview.
Views: 622430 engineerguy
(3/4) Analysis: Explaining Fourier analysis with a machine
 
04:05
► Learn more at: http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier ► Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983966176/ ► Buy the posters on Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/engineerguy ► Main videos in the series: (1/4) Introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAsM30MAHLg (2/4) Synthesis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KmVDxkia_w (4/4) Operation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfH-NbsmvD4 ► Bonus videos: Books and Posters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXgTwrblClQ Page-by-Page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMHw9GCAtE8 Spinning Machine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPQwKRt4Y2k Rocker Arms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mBuyixt22U This series on Albert Michelson’s Harmonic Analyzer celebrates a nineteenth century mechanical computer that performed Fourier analysis by using gears, springs and levers to calculate with sines and cosines—an astonishing feat in an age before electronic computers. Check out the series companion book and learn how to get a free PDF of the entire book at http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier.
Views: 187418 engineerguy
How a Wind Up Music Box Works
 
08:03
Bill reveals the engineering inside a toy music box. He describes how the comb is mass manufactured, details the spring, gears and governor that drive the box, and shares some history of early music boxes. Outtakes are included at the end of the video.
Views: 941350 engineerguy
Video for soon to be released videos
 
01:02
This video is used as a placeholder on the engineerguy website for videos that are just about the be released. In it Bill shares what some viewers have been saying about his videos.
Views: 57187 engineerguy
Britain's Giant Airship: R.101
 
16:58
You can learn more about Bill's book Fatal Flight, The True Story of Britain's Last Great Airship -- including listening to an audio version for free -- at www.engineerguy.com/airship or here on youtube (see link below). Fatal Flight brings vividly to life the year of operation of R.101, the last great British airship—a luxury liner three and a half times the length of a 747 jet, with a spacious lounge, a dining room that seated fifty, glass-walled promenade decks, and a smoking room. The British expected R.101 to spearhead a fleet of imperial airships that would dominate the skies as British naval ships, a century earlier, had ruled the seas. The dream ended when, on its demonstration flight to India, R.101 crashed in France, tragically killing nearly all aboard. Combining meticulous research with superb storytelling, Fatal Flight guides us from the moment the great airship emerged from its giant shed—nearly the largest building in the British Empire—to soar on its first flight, to its last fateful voyage. The full story behind R.101 shows that, although it was a failure, it was nevertheless a supremely imaginative human creation. The technical achievement of creating R.101 reveals the beauty, majesty, and, of course, the sorrow of the human experience. The narrative follows First Officer Noel Atherstone and his crew from the ship’s first test flight in 1929 to its fiery crash on October 5, 1930. It reveals in graphic detail the heroic actions of Atherstone as he battled tremendous obstacles. He fought political pressures to hurry the ship into the air, fended off Britain’s most feted airship pilot, who used his influence to take command of the ship and nearly crashed it, and, a scant two months before departing for India, guided the rebuilding of the ship to correct its faulty design. After this tragic accident, Britain abandoned airships, but R.101 flew again, its scrap melted down and sold to the Zeppelin Company, who used it to create LZ 129, an airship even more mighty than R.101—and better known as the Hindenburg. Set against the backdrop of the British Empire at the height of its power in the early twentieth century, Fatal Flight portrays an extraordinary age in technology, fueled by humankind’s obsession with flight. Link to Audiobook on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97OnTDaLqqk&list=PL0INsTTU1k2Vh4m4jS9oVE7GFga7OLaBZ
Views: 183260 engineerguy
The Engineering of a Disposable Diaper
 
06:34
Bill reveals the stunning engineering underlying the design of a diaper. He describes the five layers of a diaper, including the superabsorbent polymer in the diaper's core. He illustrates the action of this polymer with a stunning demonstration using a single bead of polymer: it soaks up enough water to grow from a diameter of 4 mm to nearly a half inch. You can bundle watch Bill's videos using this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0INsTTU1k2UO-2-AwomFmAs4nuZU9ht3 If you are interested in mechanical computers you'll likely enjoy his series on Albert Michelson's Harmonic Analyzer -- a 19th century machine that calculates Fourier transforms: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0INsTTU1k2UYO9Mck-i5HNqGNW5AeEwq Creative Commons Images Used in Video First cotton image is by dotlizard https://www.flickr.com/photos/dotlizard/3629871635/in/photolist-6wL3nH-fJCtP7-fJkZp6-fJm2NF-fJCjAG-9rbWDz-fJkXaR-fJCpnq-fJChsW-fJCj3j-fJkYqv-fJkMFH-fJkKQX-fJCx81-9fbqAS-2t7dsV-fJkYD4-evCAQr-7Rvj3n-9jv7xw-fJkVtr-fJChL5-6wL3Pt-fJCiJS-a8NCNs-fJkM1i-83KHYS-7Zd86f-81FxpK-8RJew9-71gYqx-4udP27-6eTbUK-a8NP7h-6YVZZZ-dvsWpG-7fpXY7-bwuAiT-pajewh-p3KEYV-effXoi-dcgm8d-cmLp8j-74NMSZ-a8N2W5-evAizP-9Q4GZk-7vUdin-oLfTJy-72Bmcy The cotton candy image is from Stefano Mortellaro https://www.flickr.com/photos/fazen/7046055433/in/photolist-bJCSNn-6EqFUq-scFn8R-kgWY1-g7QoZ-dxRQPM-eee8g9-7Trb4U-AKUjg-91ex6a-6SbCJe-8uBSRj-4SJoSi-py7we-4yrDzi-nCkFi-5YQ7es-aoDwDH-71jQhR-fvLrWL-4UJWoT-btC63o-72SYjo-8uyPWz-4SNC91-nJBQmd-776pxp-aCEG6X-9sPSN7-5AZV1s-4aTwB-8jmZFT-4yvWfN-4qSkK-714Yu4-MyqRs-bAAmGK-cxG7L9-NJbXr-pxJ9zB-dkge4S-JcjEY-3bg2bB-8DVyJg-MyqzN-3eugRY-aqjzmR-e7DTDb-4yvWFw-asawee
Views: 447073 engineerguy
Introduction: The Chemical History of a Candle by Michael Faraday (1/6)
 
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Bill Hammack introduces a five-video series on Michael Faraday’s lectures on The Chemical History of a Candle. He shares details of the series’ free companion book that helps modern viewers understand each lecture — details at http://www.engineerguy.com. He describe other features that help viewers, including a commentary track and closed captions for each lecture. ►Free Companion book to this video series http://www.engineerguy.com/faraday Text of Every Lecture | Essential Background | Guides to Every Lecture | Teaching Guide & Student Activities In these lectures Michael Faraday’s careful examination of a burning candle reveals the fundamental concepts of chemistry, while at the same time superbly demonstrating the scientific method. LINKS TO OTHER VIDEOS IN THIS SERIES ► Lectures (1/6) Introduction to Michael Faraday’s Chemical History of a Candle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrHnLXMTOWM (2/6) Lecture One: A Candle: Sources of its Flame https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6W0MHZ4jb4A (3/6) Lecture Two: Brightness of the Flame https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8vSLgaW9WQ (4/6) Lecture Three: Products of Combustion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31pLJyReFXw (5/6) Lecture Four: The Nature of the Atmosphere https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1DWHeouJYM (6/6) Lecture Five: Respiration & its Analogy to the Burning of a Candle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fb4RoPEtwso ► Bonus Videos: Lectures with Commentary Lecture One: A Candle: Sources of its Flame (Commentary version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ce0g0e9NmgQ Lecture Two: Brightness of the Flame (Commentary version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grWNnVB9B-4 Lecture Three: Products of Combustion (Commentary version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0s8anLurWp0 Lecture Four: The Nature of the Atmosphere (Commentary version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLgxPKU-JsI Lecture Five: Respiration & its Analogy to the Burning of a Candle (Commentary version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCmZfnT6_M4 ►Subscribe now! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=engineerguyvideo ►Become an advanced viewer of Engineer Guy videos - help evaluate early drafts http://www.engineerguy.com/preview COMPANION BOOK DETAILS The companion book is available as an ebook, in paperback and hardcover — and for free as a PDF. Details on all versions are at http://www.engineerguy.com/faraday Michael Faraday’s The Chemical History of a Candle with Guides to the Lectures, Teaching Guides & Student Activities Bill Hammack & Don DeCoste 190 pages | 5 x 8 | 14 illustrations Hardcover (Casebound) | ISBN 978-0-9838661-8-0 | $24.95 Paper| ISBN 978-1-945441-00-4| $11.99 eBook | ISBN 978-0-9839661-9-7 | $3.99 Audience: 01 — General Trade Subjects SCI013000 SCIENCE / Chemistry / General SCI028000 SCIENCE / Experiments & Projects SCI000000 SCIENCE / General EDU029030 EDUCATION / Teaching Methods & Materials / Science & Technology This book introduces modern readers to Michael Faraday’s great nineteenth-century lectures on The Chemical History of a Candle. This companion to the YouTube series contains supplemental material to help readers appreciate Faraday’s key insight that “there is no more open door by which you can enter into the study of science than by considering the physical phenomena of a candle.” Through a careful examination of a burning candle, Faraday’s lectures introduce readers to the concepts of mass, density, heat conduction, capillary action, and convection currents. They demonstrate the difference between chemical and physical processes, such as melting, vaporization, incandescence, and all types of combustion. And the lectures reveal the properties of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, including their relative masses and the makeup of the atmosphere. The lectures wrap up with a grand, and startling, analogy: by understanding the chemical behavior of a candle the reader can grasp the basics of respiration. To help readers understand Faraday’s key points this book has an “Essential Background” section that explains in modern terms how a candle works, introductory guides for each lecture written in contemporary language, and seven student activities with teaching guides. Author Bios Bill Hammack is a Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Illinois—Urbana, where he focuses on educating the public about engineering and science. He is the creator and host of the popular YouTube channel engineerguyvideo. Don DeCoste is a Specialist in Education in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois—Urbana, where he teaches freshmen and pre-service high school chemistry teachers. He is the co-author of four chemistry textbooks.
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(2/4) Synthesis: A machine that uses gears, springs and levers to add sines and cosines
 
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► Learn more at: http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier ► Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983966176/ ► Buy the posters on Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/engineerguy ► Other videos in the series: (1/4) Introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAsM30MAHLg (3/4) Analysis:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dW6VYXp9HM (4/4) Operation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfH-NbsmvD4 ► Bonus videos: Books and Posters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXgTwrblClQ Page-by-Page:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMHw9GCAtE8 Spinning Machine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPQwKRt4Y2k Rocker Arms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mBuyixt22U This series on Albert Michelson’s Harmonic Analyzer celebrates a nineteenth century mechanical computer that performed Fourier analysis by using gears, springs and levers to calculate with sines and cosines—an astonishing feat in an age before electronic computers. Check out the series companion book and learn how to get a free PDF of the entire book at http://www.engineerguy.com/fourier.
Views: 270097 engineerguy
Cell Phone Design
 
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Bill uses a pile of old cell phones to show the seven basic design constraints that shape a mobile phone. You can find a transcript of this video at http://www.engineerguy.com/videos/video-cell-02.htm. If you would like to translate the captions first check on YouTube to see what translations we have and if we your language hasn't been translated visit http://www.engineerguy.com/translate
Views: 472458 engineerguy
Ferris Wheel: How the Eiffel Tower wasn't good enough
 
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In this radio commentary, Bill tells the story of the origins of an engineering marvel found at every amusement park, the Ferris Wheel. This radio piece was first broadcast February 15, 2005. Visit this link to view complete list of media attributions http://goo.gl/fmGESM.
Views: 141799 engineerguy