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Stick Welding Cast Iron Repair using 7018 Welding Rods

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Welding Cast Iron Repair using 7018 Welding Rods. Cast iron can be tricky to repair because it wants to crack from welding. For this repair I stick welded cast iron to cast iron using 7018 welding electrodes and then I tried stick welding cast iron to mild steel using the same 7018 welding electrodes. This repair was done using the cold method, meaning no preheat or post heat was used. Follow along as I demonstrate how to repair cast iron using 7018 welding rods. Disclaimer: This is for entertainment purposes only. Do not weld your cast iron cookware. You could poison yourself. More Cast Iron Welding Videos Here: https://youtu.be/9pMbeG7QVZA?list=PLfbf78fMz9VpweFv4IqUfrrNV6Vvro7Cd ⇨ SUBSCRIBE to Brandon Lund DIY Builds: https://www.youtube.com/brandonlund THE TOOLS & GEAR I USE 🔴 https://www.amazon.com/shop/brandonlund Any commission earned from the above Amazon affiliate links all goes towards helping to support my channel. MUSIC By: Joakim Karud http://youtube.com/joakimkarud FOLLOW ME (for behind the scenes stuff)! ⇨ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lunddiybuilds ⇨ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LundDIYBuilds ⇨ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LundDIYBuilds For Business Inquiries: [email protected] Disclaimer: These videos are intended for entertainment purposes only and as such, you should not attempt to do any of the things you see me doing. Always read and follow the manufacturer’s safety guidelines before handling tools. Seek professional advice and training before using any welding equipment. Never operate any tool without wearing the proper personal protective equipment. Final warning, Do not attempt to do any of the things you see me doing!
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Text Comments (235)
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
This is a cast iron repair series. We all know that brazing / silicon bronze or nickle are traditional repair methods, but what about methods and fillers not usually associated with cast iron repairs? We are experimenting with different processes and different filler metals with preheat and without. There are many ways to repair cast iron, If you ask 20 people how to properly repair it, you will get 20 different answers. Do you guys have any cast iron repair stories to share?
Bikes Ride I (21 days ago)
Wrong rod dude
Brandon Lund (21 days ago)
This is part of a series so it was the rod selected for the test. There may have been one other rod that tested higher in the series but it wasn't by much. I considered it a success...especially when you compare the cost vs performance to a specialty rod.
Frank Strange (1 month ago)
It looks good
Brandon Lund (1 month ago)
Thanks man
AbdRahman Abdullah (2 months ago)
Awesomes brilliant experiments
Brandon Lund (2 months ago)
Thank you very much!
sojourn Traveler (2 months ago)
Glad you have good results with this I on the other hand have to use HEAT , Heat and more heat for best results. That is my best vice Hot enough that the cast and the 7018 puddle together. Peen it all out the same way as this video and wrap it in isolation to where it was still too hot to touch the next day when I checked it out. Left it alone to finish cooling down very slowly and it still is holding.
sojourn Traveler (2 months ago)
Thanks for the comeback, some good considerations for success.
Brandon Lund (2 months ago)
Very nice! I think the reason this worked without preheat is because I welded very short beads and allowed it to cool to touch before I welded another bead. As you said, preheat and insulated cool down is the safest bet though. Cheers
Kerry Roberts (2 months ago)
6011 lot of penning
Brandon Lund (2 months ago)
I have not had much success with 6011. Maybe I will give it another go.
Greg Guare (2 months ago)
Handle walked and circumfrance squared up. Good vid, interesting.
Brandon Lund (2 months ago)
Thank you!
David Birmingham (3 months ago)
I have a tractor engin block to weld so if you can I would like to see it done .cast engin block , thanks
Brandon Lund (3 months ago)
I like that idea David! I'll see what I can do. It might be hard finding one that is cracked though.
Bernard Bruinsma (3 months ago)
Hi Brandon, Great video thanks sharing your knowledge :) How does peening relieve stress in the metal?
Bernard Bruinsma (3 months ago)
+Brandon Lund Thank you for the explanation.
Brandon Lund (3 months ago)
Thank you! There is no short answer to peining. AWS has some good info but basically it works to take some of the tensil properties and expand the filler metal into compression
Gary Van Collins (4 months ago)
The same method works with flux core wire feed too. Weld a little here, peen and weld a little there, peen moving around with no preheat like you just did.
Brandon Lund (4 months ago)
Thanks Gary! I've been wondering the same, so I'm going to do a video doing just that! It should be out in a couple weeks. I get a lot of criticism when I do that type of video, so be sure to hit the notifications bell...I'm sure the comments will be interesting :) take care brother!
ISAAC SANCHEZ-RUIZ (5 months ago)
would it handle the temperature change without cracking?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
It sure will!
treefrogjoness (5 months ago)
If you are trying to weld a crack in an engine block or cylinder head, it's very difficult and I would say that even if by chance you seemed to have welded it with 7018, it wouldn't hold up because of the difference in expansion rates of the metals.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I have never tried to weld and engine block or a cylinder head with 7018, but one of the commenters below actually posted that he welded up a cracked cylinder head and the repair lasted for many years. Another poster said he welded an old tractor axle...If that's all you got, It appears it can be done.
SuperNemesis9 (5 months ago)
Nickel aluminum rods and pre heat.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Nickle is a good repair material, just not for this. Nickle is a carcinogen.
Shaun Gronda (5 months ago)
Thermal growth co efficient are different one metal is expanding and contracting at a different rate. It will always pull and break
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
That's what makes cast iron difficult to weld. Limiting heat input and peening are key.
todd Brewer (5 months ago)
Do they still make the specialty rod 30816?
todd Brewer (5 months ago)
I used some to fix the cast iron front end of a Ford 4000 farm tractor and loved it.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
They sure do!
dzopik (5 months ago)
You dont have proper rods. Do you know ESAB?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your comment. This is a series where we are experimenting with different processes and filler metals... Last week we experimented with nickel rods / no pre-heat and TIG. We are trying different things and seeing what works and what doesn't and then doing a crude testing method to see how things shake out. Yes I know ESAB.
Faded (5 months ago)
Just use a mig-welder
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks for your comment...yes, mig welding has worked on a few occasions. This is part of a series where we are trying different processes and filler metals. Another viewer mentioned flux core, so that very well could be in an upcoming video! Cheers
INF1D3L010 (5 months ago)
If that joint has broken 3 times now, either the skillet is made of inferior iron or your welding skills are AWOL. Being that you're cold-welding it with 7018, the latter is probably the case. When cold-welding (ie with no appreciable pre-heat), Silicon Bronze brazing is the only thing that will hold up. If you're just gonna keep welding it back together with 7018 and no pre-heat, you might as well just sell your welder and buy a new set of pans with the money you get from it lol. I certainly wouldn't trust anything you've welded after seeing this video. Just sayin...
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
INF1D3L010 No worries man that seems to be a common misconception amongst some in the welding community that there is only one way to weld cast iron and that’s simply just not true. Many others including myself have successfully used various filling metals some with preheat some without and have produced solid long lasting repairs. And yes we all know tig brazing with silicon bronze and nickel rod is also great repair, that’s not what this series is about. We are experimenting and trying new things and finding out what works and what doesn’t. There are many ways to repair and weld cast iron. If you asked 20 people you’ll get 20 different answers
INF1D3L010 (5 months ago)
You act like you're telling me something I don't know lol. I already know the best way to re-join those two pieces together, and that's by TIG brazing it with silicon bronze filler. That's pretty much the only way you can "weld" cold cast iron together. You could skip all the tests and go straight to what is known to work. Not trying to be a prick... Just sayin...
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your comment. It's called the cold welding technique. Normally cast iron is pre heated then welded and its cooling rate is controlled. I'm not breaking it and welding it back together each week using the same fillers. This is part of a video series where we are trying different filler materials and different welding processes. Cast iron is very different than mild steel.
Mario R (5 months ago)
I don’t think any food weight that much 😂 good welding
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks! 👍
Bob Schwaller (5 months ago)
Old school cast iron welding trick is don't use a grinder. Clean the edges with a file or chisel. The grinder puts inpurities into the metal
Kenneth Caine (5 months ago)
I don't know what you're trying to prove, using a 7018. There are so many cast iron rods on the market, and I have used some of them with great success. The best one I have ever used was a certainum 889. But I have used other brands with good results.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I am not trying to prove anything Kenneth. I'm just a guy welding and experimenting on some cast iron and trying to help others at the same time.
its simple (5 months ago)
Pre heat
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your comment. This is what is referred to as the cold welding technique.
Brian Anderson (5 months ago)
If u hook the welder up backwards and use the ground rod for the rod it will draw the heat out and will have hardly any heat and no cracks I do it all the time a old man told me years ago and I've made a lot of money using it try it on hear as a test no leaks eather.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I think you are the 2nd person that has mentioned this in the last year or so....I had not heard of this before and I have not tried it yet. I am very curious to see how this works. It makes sense. Are you using an AC welder when you do this?
Ŕay Leslie (5 months ago)
Stainless steel is the way to go
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your comment. Yes I have had good luck with 309 also
poogoosee bagoomba (5 months ago)
I used to be a industrial mechanic back in the eighties, had a broken cast iron arm that traveled on a roller on our wool scouring line. I was going to weld it with 7018 low hydrogen on dc current. one of the business owners said you can't weld cast iron. ( he was my department head.) I did it anyway and it lasted 7 years until we replaced the whole scouring line.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Nice...The one thing I'm learning by sharing this information is that everyone seems to think there way is only one way and there way is the right way. As you discovered, there are a bunch of ways...some are more unconventional than others. Good on you for giving it a go...it bet boss man was happy at the end of the day... you saved him a pile of cash :)
Vova BarannikSmirnoff (5 months ago)
Ещё бы прогреть чугун
Luther Bryson (5 months ago)
You got to preheat cast
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your reply Luther, i'm demonstrating the cold method using 7018.
akbychoice (5 months ago)
Did a similar test back about 1978 with cast iron heads and 7018 rod, worked just fine. Machined and surface ground and ran like a new head.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+akbychoice Impressive! Nice job!
akbychoice (5 months ago)
Brandon Lund it was cracked along where the oil passages were.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
NICE! Just curious, was it cracked in the combustion chamber or elsewhere?
Quentin Karamitsos (5 months ago)
I love the testing set up !
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks! I figured it would give us a rough baseline to see how our repairs are holding up :)
c woody (5 months ago)
Nickel rod is the proper rod
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
c woody I agree that nickel is a good filler for cast repair, just not for this. Nickel is a carcinogen.
You're welding downhill with 7018. DON'T DO THAT.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
большая эрекция i agree 100% if it were steel, but I’m welding vertical down to help eliminate heat input.
Jayhere (5 months ago)
When would you ever hold 114.6 pounds of bacon and eggs in that skillet at one time?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+Caleb Burnett Im hungry now! :)
Caleb Burnett (5 months ago)
Breakfast
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
You never know.... 😂😂😂👍👊
Walkertongdee (5 months ago)
I did that with stainless rod held well
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Walkertongdee another tried and true method! :) thanks
Dylan Crow (5 months ago)
I can weld just about anything, but if an accident ever happened in the kitchen because that handle popped loose, I'd never forgive myself.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Dylan Crow I agree 100%. The only reason I used a cast iron skillet for this demonstration was so no one could claim its cast steel or some other metal. I think universally everyone can agree it’s made of cast iron. I get a lot of criticism whenever I do cast iron repair videos, so I figured I remove one variable that people could argue about. I think I paid less than 10 bucks for the pan so no big loss to just scrap it. Thanks for your support.
61Benster (5 months ago)
For practice and knowledge I understand what you're doing but for heavens sake, just go buy a new pan. They're not that expensive
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
61Benster 👍 i actually bought this pan specifically to destroy, weld and test. I have no intention on using it again. I might have considered it, but the first repair that was done was using nickel rod and nickel is a carcinogen so it’s a no go for me after that. Thanks brother!
Mr91caprice (5 months ago)
Get that pan red hot then weld in that mild steal
VW5767 (5 months ago)
Good stuff!!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
VW5767 thanks man!
caleb Michael (5 months ago)
Why not use nickel rod.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
You are correct, Nickel is a good choice for cast iron, but not for cookware. Nickel is a carcinogen.
Rickarama Trama (5 months ago)
I always wondered about this so now I need some 7018 rod and get after it. Thanks for the education.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Your welcome!
Ahmad Ali (5 months ago)
7018 would've worked if you preheat the metal and do a CJP weld and then post heat. There were pin holes in his weld on the handle which contributed to the weld breaking.
Ahmad Ali (5 months ago)
As for the center piece, I would've ran a tig root after a preheat and then 7018 cover and on the other side a CJP tig root and 7018 cover grind it all flush and post heat.
Ahmad Ali (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund I'm a certified welder/fabricator. On the handle you could've preheated and then ran a 6010 root, grind the face and hot pass 3/32 7018 and then ran the 1/8 cover. On the inside, you would grind out all the trash down to the root and run 3/32 7018 hot pass and 1/8 7018 cover. Grind it all down flush and post heat. Yeah the pin holes, make the area weak. So you have to grind them out. That's why i said a CJP (complete joint penetration) weld would work.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I haven’t tried a pre/post heat dissimilar repair with cast/carbon/7018 so I can’t really can’t say for sure if it would have worked. The bottom is a tough repair anyways because it’s effected radially as opposed to the handle that could expand outwards. I had it grooved fairly deep. I was more trying to see how the repair would work doing the cold method with 7018. As I’m sure your aware, it’s pretty common to have trash float to the top and create those little worm holes. You would not normally see them unless your grind it, which I could have filled again. For this demonstration, it was not really necessary. Are you a pipeliner by chance? Thanks for the comment brother.
The Garlic Farm (5 months ago)
We now know the breaking strength when repaired with Muggy weld and 7018. The first number we should have known is the breaking strength of a new Lodge pan.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I thought of that after the fact...A new lodge pan would be much more...probably around 150 pounds before breaking. Unlike steel, cast repairs are never as strong as original.
Eazy Rider (5 months ago)
ive had success preheating and using stainless rods on a cast brake drum.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Stainless can also be a good repair method :)
jeffmack57 (5 months ago)
Amazing 🔥🔥🔥🔥
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you!
Dave King (5 months ago)
Did he just run a 7018 down?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Dave King thanks for your support man! Both trades are very good and pay well. It sounds like your family has a good work ethic so I believe you’ll go far! Cheers
Dave King (5 months ago)
My whole family is nothing but workers. My father is the type of guy that would rather conversate and socialize with people and dont get me wrong theres nothing wrong with that I would just rather be a diesel mechanic and also a welder. Thanks brotha keep up the informational videos!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Dave King you are correct. If this was steel it would be frowned upon. Your wise for your age. Keep it up brother!
Dave King (5 months ago)
Im 15 so no sir I dont have the experiance you do but ive done a fair bit of welding cause I grew up in a shop, I was always told that it is illegal once your a certified welder to do that.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Yes, welding cast is not like welding mild steel. Just like the short tracks, welding down can also help reduce heat imput.
martinthemillwright (5 months ago)
this is a frying pan: so that's ok: but never do this in industrial applications
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I've actually repaired some fairly critical pieces using 7018, including a heavy duty cast iron vise and it's still going strong after almost 10 years. It's just another tool to have in your toolbox if your in a pinch.
Robert Brito (5 months ago)
Try starless steel rod I think it's the best
INF1D3L010 (5 months ago)
I've got a better idea for ya: Try learning how to weld first lol. Welding a cast iron pan with stainless filler metal will only make the cracks look prettier, at twice the price, mind you.
Robert H (5 months ago)
Pre heat and peening is key.
Eric Charette (5 months ago)
Tig it
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Ok :) https://youtu.be/-XUbzw6p83Q
J Ancel (5 months ago)
Great info, I wasn't really sure what/how to weld cast...thanks
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I’m glad I could help! 😁
John Moore (5 months ago)
Just spray it with wire. Welded plenty of cast with a wire welder.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you for your comment, I have had good luck also.
Henrik Norrstrom (5 months ago)
Ok americans just how large is a 1/8" rod? Is it a 2,5mm rod? Or even a 3,2mm? Would not weld with any of those on just 50A thou. Well 70.18 like Esab ok 48.00's are ok to weld cast Iron if it's just a quick fix.
Henrik Norrstrom (5 months ago)
+Miguel Castaneda Thanks! Must be hard at such low amps.
Miguel Castaneda (5 months ago)
Henrik Norrstrom 3.1mm
Matt Machuta (5 months ago)
Preheat in the center! Edges don't care as much...
Michael Rhoads (5 months ago)
312's
David Martin (5 months ago)
Cast iron sucks. Worst metal ever. Try nickel rods next
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Cast iron can be tricky. Nickel is one of the methods I prefer, but for something like this you have to be careful using nickel because it’s a carcinogen. This or stainless is going to be the safest.
Intelligent Being (5 months ago)
Should've cut a piece out of the exhaust manifold to patch the hole in the bottom.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Good call! Your comment suggests you have been following along with this little cast iron series I have been doing. Thank you for your continued support and for being a regular viewer!
MrRussianProduction (5 months ago)
do a preheat and post heat, sudden heat on cast creates to much tension
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I agree that pre and post heat are best, but this was an experiment to see how 7018 worked doing cold method. If you go low and slow, it can be done in certain circumstances.
Elka Bronson (5 months ago)
Have you test fcaw?
Elka Bronson (5 months ago)
Brandon Lund Can’t wait too see
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
I have not, but I have tried with solid wire and c-25 with success. I might just try fcaw in a future video.
Jimmie Burleigh (5 months ago)
They make a cast rod for cast iron
Scot G (5 months ago)
Or you could just do it right the first time & weld it with nickel 99. If not, please list a disclaimer "How NOT to weld cast iron".
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Scot G Why would I recommend using a carcinogen on cookware? Nickel is poisonous! Based on your comment, you seem to be the one who needs an education in doing stuff right 😁
Turbo Chevelle (5 months ago)
Just a note, don't make the mistake of using low hydrogen rod on cast iron that will need to be machined, you will regret it and it will cost you dearly in tooling.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Spot on brother!
Tom Flower (5 months ago)
The best rod to use is nickel rod. The shrink characteristics are almost identical to cast iron. No preheating is required.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Nickel is one of the methods I prefer, but for something like this you have to be careful using nickel because it’s a carcinogen. This or stainless is going to be the safest.
readyset (5 months ago)
Man you really hate that Cast Iron Pan..
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
It sure takes a beating! 🤣🤣🤣
Alek Rudy (5 months ago)
My opinion on the reasons why you got crack in the middle - is different from yours. I think it happend not because of materials being dissimilar, but because of geometry. That cast iron in the middle of your frying pen had no room to move during its contruction when cooling. Your weld was all surrounded by very hard (and "strong") cast iron. That cast iron did not let it move, so it had to crack. Contrary to that, when you welded that round piece at the edge of the frying pen, it could easily expand to outside and then safely move back when shrinking. Thus avoiding cracks.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Good point and I agree with this. I also think the 7018 rod does not have the elongation charasticistics as other rods which are more compatible with welding cast iron. Im thinking nickel might have done the trick without cracking but I didnt want to use nickel because it's a carcinogen. Thanks for the great comment!
Shawn Jackson (5 months ago)
309 works pretty good
stephen e (5 months ago)
Cast iron needs to be preheated before welding. That would help with the cracking.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
It can be done successfully without a preheat as I have demonstrated in a few videos. I just wanted to give a few more examples of cast iron repairs. Cheers.
phdfxwg Fischercat (5 months ago)
but will it hold a Fred Flinstone breakfast ?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
It sure will! 😁
Alex Scott (5 months ago)
Cast iron pans are 20bucks....🤔
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Nah, I paid $7 for this one and I've smashed it, weight tested it until it breaks and welded it back together 3 different times using different processes and welding rods. I've definately got my money's worth.
J D (5 months ago)
http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/welding-rods-for-dissimilar-metals.html
J D (5 months ago)
they make welding rods for welding cast iron to steel,steel to stainless steel, and stainless to cast iron. look up dissimilar metals welding rods. they are also called maintenance rods. they have a very high tensile strength. nickel rods are a joke.
AKTrapper (5 months ago)
I think he is well aware of the different rods made for cast iron to steel ect, the point of the video however was to see how 7018 would preform. Better then I expected but I think his success was in the technique.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you!
Ahmet Bal (5 months ago)
Yenisini al dostum
you will be triggered (5 months ago)
i just put some duct tape on my pan
john doe (5 months ago)
GEE what do you fry that needs that much weight
Jesse Hudson (5 months ago)
I'm a student welder. Could you explain the metallurgy behind peening these welds? It's seems pretty self explanatory, but could you maybe so a short video on that method. Love your video, keep it up!
Alek Rudy (5 months ago)
Lucas Knie, I absolutely agree with you, Sir.
Lucas Knie (5 months ago)
+Alek Rudy completely understandable. I agree my phrasing was a little rough. I think we both understand the basic concept behind peening, just different ways and terms of explanation.
Alek Rudy (5 months ago)
Lucas Knie, your example with hitting nut on a rusted bolt is a good example. I like it. I myself did not even look at it this way before. My imperfection in English is not that bad that I would had difficulty of not catching right away the difference between shrinking and expansion :) I was talking about your phrase "... but the cast will not...", not about me not understanding the difference between shrinking and expansion. For a minute I was thinking that you were talking about "cast" - as about "mold", "detail" (and I thought that I just did not catch this.) But no: you are talking about "cast" as "cast iron", material, metal. So I am withdrawing my words that I did not understand your words because of my English, and my position stays the same: you worded this particular phrase "...but the cast will not..." badly, exactly as I described in my previous comment. I checked in Google: thermal expansion for a cast iron is about 10 percent less than thermal expansion for iron. It just means it would shrink slightly less than iron, rather helping us to avoid even more cracks. Upd: Sorry, I only now got that you were talking about heating the rusted nut, not about hitting it with hammer. My bad. But still a good example, though a little bit out of subject of our disscussion, on my opinion.
Lucas Knie (5 months ago)
+Alek Rudy so as a non native English speaker it makes sense you wouldn't understand. Shrinking means going from bigger to smaller. Hence, when you peening it, it makes it "expand- meaning smaller to bigger." Cast does expand and contract like every other steel. Just not nearly as much. The expansion is like the concept of heating a nut to free it from a rusted bolt. It causes the nut to expand, breaking the rust seal. Then after it cools, it shrinks back down to size. It is a factor causing warpage as well.
Alek Rudy (5 months ago)
Lucas Knie, I disagree with your statement that I said the same thing you did. You said: " ..the concept behind peening is to decrease shrinkage (when welding cast iron with 7018-th).' While I am saying: When using peening when welding cast iron with 7018-th, we COMPENSATE the shrinkage of brittle cast iron for the cost of deposited soft 7018 metal, hard hitting 7018 metal with a welding hammer, making dents on its surface and forcing it to actually EXPAND towards contracting cast iron. Another you phrase, in my humble opinion, is worded bad and unclear: "...your weld will start to shrink, but the cast will not..." You had to specify: "...your weld will start to shrink, but the big massive body of cast iron around your weld will not follow the shrinkage of your weld, thus causing tension and therefore cracks along the weld. You had to preheat the whole massive cast iron workpiece, so after welding the whole cast iron detail would shrink together with your weld, thus avoiding creation of tension and cracks." Sorry, Sir, but right now this your phrase sounds like cast iron is not subjected to heat shrinkage as a material... At least to me, as to a non-native English speaker...
tdej80 (5 months ago)
I used to have access to a huge forge that could be closed. I have put deep bevels for full penetration on cast iron. Then gotten the parts red hot and welded at super low amps. Then cycled in and out of the forge to keep the parts hot. After completion of welding back into forge red hot for 15 minutes then close lid and shut forge down. 24 hours later part still to hot to touch. At 2 days part is cooled to room temp. Using that method I successfully welded cast iron with 7018 stick many times.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
That's awesome!
Airborne 1966 (5 months ago)
you have to consider the thickness of the cast in the bottom compared to the thicker handle area
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
The handle and bottom were fairly close if I remember correctly, but I could be wrong.
Mountain Mike D (5 months ago)
MG 289 rods are excellent for this type of repair, but expensive. If you get a lot of porosity then butter it with Normacast first. You may also want to try Washington alloys Tensile weld or 312 stainless. There are so many other options besides nickel rod depending on the base metal condition. 7018 does work. I have also had good luck MIG welding some exhaust manifolds on import cars with 70S-2 wire. You don't know until you try. Good video!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks bud, I appreciate your support! You hit the nail on the head when you said "You don't know until you try". Thats what this is all about! I repaired a broken off leg from a cast iron park bench using 70s2 MIG and it worked like a charm. I did pre and post heat for that one. I'll have to check out the MG 289 and Washington Alloys rods.
pedrosixfour (5 months ago)
Always thought it was a bad idea to grind cast iron before welding as it just adds more contaminants from the grinding process, and the only real option to prep the pieces is a chisel. Am I totally incorrect?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+pedrosixfourthanks brother! I have a few boxes of gouging rods but I've never tried using them on an inverter welder. I might have to give it a go and see what happens. I knew you were just asking, i didnt take take your comment in a negative way 👍
pedrosixfour (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund Wasn't having a go at you, I was curious to hear your thoughts on the subject is all. I must investigate the gouging electrodes you mentioned. Keep up the fine work!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Yes and no...the best method is to use gouging electrodes. The gouging rods will bevel out the joint while burning out any oil and contaminants. The next best method is to use a die grinder with a metal cutter (not a stone) and lastly to use an abrasive wheel. You could use a chisel but I've never tried....does any of this matter? Probably not for most repairs. I've had excellent results with preheat, welding / peining and then burying in sand.
RANDALLOLOGY (5 months ago)
Pour Skillet will never fry an egg again.lol
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Hmmmm. Now you got me thinking! Maybe I will see if I can get this thing repaired and back in service...that might be interesting considering all the abuse it's seen lately :)
Jim Murphy (5 months ago)
Let the heat go out of the slag before you chip
Angelo Joson (5 months ago)
Do full weld not tackweld
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+Angelo Joson Glad I could help. Here is a link to some more cast iron repair videos. I think it will start with this video, but you can skip to the next. Cast iron is fun to work with because there are so many ways to repair it. Thanks for watching and I'm glad you enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pMbeG7QVZA&list=PLfbf78fMz9VqxPZTT-xmwdcrHVa7ML-ft
Angelo Joson (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund wow thanks bro for new technique. Im gonna try it too :) infact i just ask some neigbors if they have broken pans :) so i wont buy and i will have more hahaha. Thanks for new technique.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Absolutely not. If you did a full weld, It would cause the cast iron to crack. When you dont use a preheat, you have to keep the heat input very low, which is why you always (even with preheat) limit the amount of heat you put into the part. .
ZenMinus (5 months ago)
No pre-heat and no post-heat to cool down = cracks.
glenn moreland (4 months ago)
+ZenMinus https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F173481895787
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+ZenMinus that's sad. Where I live (Maine) paper mills were huge business 20 years ago. They employed thousands. The paper industry dried up and went overseas and now massive warehouses sit vacant and town populations were wiped out because mill workers moved away when the jobs were gone. It's sad when local jobs get shipped away overseas and huge corporations put the little guy out of business. Take care and I appreciate your support!
ZenMinus (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund The manufacturing and repair industry and engineering in general is VERY limited in Australia. The combination of VERY HIGH union wages, cheap imports and cheaper manufacturing facilities in China killed off most of Australia's industrial capability. Australia's population is too small to be self sustaining. MANY small businesses have been wiped out by larger corporations. The "local hardware store" was wiped out 10-15 years ago we just have ONE enormous hardware chain (Bunnings) and a couple of smaller hardware chain stores. I could go on.....
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+ZenMinus I agree with your comment. I was just saying that not everyone has an oxy rig setup. I've heard from other folks in Australia that cast iron rod is no longer available? Why was it discontinued? It is still available here in the states. Cheers brother!
ZenMinus (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund ...but I was referring to the central patch of dissimilar metal. The best way to weld cast iron is with a cast iron welding rod and oxy outfit. This also requires pre & post heat. The result is an almost invisible join, as the cast iron rod welding rod melds with the main material. I don't know if you can obtain cast iron rods now. They are not available in Australia.
Adam Johanson (5 months ago)
Nice!!! Always fun testing how weld we make do
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks. It's kinda fun trying to break them too!
Tracy Curtright (5 months ago)
Did better than I thought it would but if I didn't have cast rod I would use 309
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Tracy, it surprised me too! I plan to do some stainless testing in an upcoming video. Cheers brother!
Derek N. Eder (5 months ago)
Sweet!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thanks man!
Berzo project (5 months ago)
why break the weld?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
This video is part of a series where I've used different process and rods to repair cast iron. I wanted to see how this repair held up compared to other repairs within the series.
georgio jansen (5 months ago)
they have battery powered hand hammer, and i would use limarosta,
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
georgio jansen Yes sir! 😁 I will do a stainless / cast iron repair in an upcoming episode. Thank you 👍
Vermonster90 (5 months ago)
Why in the notes do say "dont weld cast iron cookware, you could poison yourself" but you are clearly welding castiron
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Awesome! I have videos of both :) Thanks for watching, I appreciate your support!
Vermonster90 (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund - yes spent few years in Vermont, in Southern New England now. I'm doing a few projects with the welder fixing a trailer and might fix a crack in a wood stove. It how I found your cast iron video.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
+Vermonster90 I took a pause for a few years too so I understand where your coming from. That sounds like a neat rig you just bought. I'm glad to hear your getting back into welding. So I have to ask...are you a fellow New Englander? The reason I ask is that the word Vermont is part of your screen name. Cheers
Vermonster90 (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund great explanation didn't realize that was the case, I am just getting back into welding after 31 year pause. Bought a flux mig and 3 in 1 tig stick plasma cutter box. Am checking out vids and looking forward to getting back at it.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Vermonster90 so when someone decides to use nickel rod, which is a carcinogen and they decide I’m to blame for poisoning them. Same reason McDonald’s needs to warm people on their coffee cups “caution coffee is hot”. Lack of common sense
outwhitu08 (5 months ago)
Good test, gotta love the 7018! Lots of stuff still holding with those rods, its been my go to rod for years, have you ever tried any certainium 704? They supposed to be for dissimilar and unknown base metals, i think there 100k psi, i have a pack of them someone gave me, run just like the 7018, great video and test, thanks
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
outwhitu08 thank you, I have not tried them. I will have to look into it though :)
R Reichel (5 months ago)
You also have the option of using a rod meant for cast iron or a nickel rod would work much better than 7018 which would probably break pretty easily when you drop it. As far as the pre heat goes you don't necessarily need to pre heat thinner cast iron more so the thicker cast iron because the heat escapes so fast. And you're welding downhill is a big no no.
R Reichel (5 months ago)
+Brandon Lund You can but, I would not. it's much cleaner as tig wire as the flux does the cleaning with stick rods. In my humble opinion 😁
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
JustJacob FYI you can also use a nickel stick electrode to tig with if you remove the flux coating. I would caution you though about using nickel on cookware. It’s a carcinogen.
R Reichel (5 months ago)
+JustJacob Na, its Steel and worthless don't bother get the nickel. You can get nickel tig wire then tig weld it.
JustJacob (5 months ago)
That’s what I always used; nickel rods. I’ve heard that you can tig and use a coat hanger for filler rod in a pinch. Never tried it though.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
R Reichel, this is an ongoing series. Last week we used nickel rod and tested, the week prior was a different process also. 7018 has decedent elongation as compared to other electrodes. Vertical down helps reduce heat imput, especially with a rod not typically designed for cast iron and without a pre heat.
Shadowops365 (5 months ago)
Very informative 👌
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you!
MAC VENA (5 months ago)
Why not Nickel?
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
MAC VENA this is an ongoing series. I have been experimenting with a bunch of different repair processes and methods repairing cast iron. So far nickle rod made by muggy weld has come out on top, but as I mentioned in the video, it's just another tool in the toolbox. If you go to the beginner welding series playlist, you will see some cast iron welding and testing videos that you might find interesting.
Ray B. (5 months ago)
Thing is 7018 rod is inexpensive and readily available.. The HF rods seem to be pretty decent and also inexpensive!
Ray B. (5 months ago)
Yes, I noticed this.. What is good beyond the price is the smaller packs which exposes the rods to less moisture.. Going to give them a try..
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Right on. I'm not sure if you caught it, but this was HF 7018 rod. I have no issues what so ever and I like that its inexpensive.
Tank Soldier (5 months ago)
That JUNKA game is going to catch on yet , How about a stainless steel rod ?
Ilan (5 months ago)
@ Nimbus. For about the same price you get better with the 312, the 309 being already good on cast steel. The use of the 312 on cast iron is not "official" but since more than 40 years it has been used at least in Europe. As the 312 has an elongation to break of 23% with a yield of 115000 PSI it's able to absorb almost all the thermal movements of the cast iron during the reparation, plus local stresses, vibrations and so on. It replaces in most of the cases the very expensive nickel rods and the indecently expensive very hard to find hastelloy rods. The 312 can be machined and needs only a simple rod welder like a cheap Chinese 200 bucks inverter which are now pretty good. The lone competitor I know is a AC TIG with pulse welder (more than 3000 bucks) with argon and aluminium bronze metal filler, but it's a professional tool for a rather skilled guy... http://www.matweb.com/search/datasheet.aspx?matguid=69daeb1a6c274bd48acccb833861dbdc&ckck=1
Nimbus Nimbus (5 months ago)
+Ilan I've used 309 rods for welding cast steel. Never tried it on cast iron
Ilan (5 months ago)
There is far better choice than a 308 made for welding 304 nothing more. the 309 is for welding stainless steel to ordinary steel, little more use. The SS 312. was Invented for welding gas turbine blades. It's very strong (more than the 7018), but it remains ductile with no fragility to vibrations, thermal shocks and other miseries. It's the better choice for welding unknown or dissimilar steels, high alloyed steels, and also cast iron (as it works at low amps, is very ductile, and does not form brittle compounds). I've used it extensively for for professional repairs: crankshafts, difficult steels (special alloys, springs, tooling steel etc...) and cast iron (beds, pianos, engines, compressors, pumps, exhaust collectors,etc...). In some cases alu bronze AC Tig or nickel alloys are more indicated at high cost but the 312 can handle 90 % of the repairs. The price is moderate and it's the easiest rod in the world. On 85 % of the repairs on cast iron, if you are clever and methodical no preheating is needed. That's useful when you have to repair urgently a crack on a diesel engine inside the cramped machine room of a fishing boat.
tgp nick andrew (5 months ago)
308 is also good for welding manganese to carbon steel.
Silent Stryker (5 months ago)
7018 all the way! We use this rod almost exclusively from 1/8 up to 1/4. Loader bucket rebuilds on site in the dirt baby nothing is better than old schoo!
1rustytree (5 months ago)
Good enough to hold my bacon and eggs, I'd call it fixed!
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Now I'm craving bacon..thanks! 🤣🤣🤣
Miquel Anesto (5 months ago)
Fluxcore mig will work a lot better for the reasons I do not know.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Gaston Glow Right on! I have a video where I fixed a park bench using mig wire and I used preheat also. So far so good with that repair also! Thanks for your support
Gaston Glow (5 months ago)
ive welded and added lost material to cast iron with regular 0.9 mig wire. but i preheated it and let it cool down slowly in hot sand. it didnt break yet. so i think its good.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Well if you think it can beat this weight, maybe we need to have a smackdown where we try a bunch of different fillers?
Bruce D (5 months ago)
When I try to join dissimilar metals I use a rod from Air Liquide which they call the" Extreme rod" it is high in nickel , it seems to work well Like your work, can you do more welding repair videos?
Bruce D (5 months ago)
thanks Brandon, the rod is Xtreme product ~ Blu-5321-12532 on Air Liquide's Canadian web page under Blueshield MNR specialty and maintenance electrodes
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Hmmmmmm. I'm going to have to do some research. I have not heard of this rod. I'm glad your enjoying the content. I enjoy doing this type of video also so yes, you can expect more in the near furure... probably this Friday 😁
Roger Thompson (5 months ago)
0
Carl Jorgensen (5 months ago)
Nice job keep it up.
Brandon Lund (5 months ago)
Thank you! 👍

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